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Inquisicion Mexicana: PEDRO RUIZ DE HARO, CRISTOBAL ORDOÑEZ

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By jrefugioghermosillo - Posted on 22 February 2018

This is the limpieza of Petronila de Haro, daughter of Pedro Ruiz de Haro cc Leonor Arias.
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSD2-W771-P?i=381&cat=31792

Her husband, Gonzalo de Morillo, had been named familiar de la Inquisicion in Compestela, and limpiezas were required for both of them. His limpieza begins here.
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSD2-W784-K?cat=31792

The paternal grandparents of Petronila de Haro were Pedro de Haro cc Francisca Muñoz, and her maternal grandparents were Miguel Arias and Francisca de Torres, of Medellin, Reinos de Castilla. Her mother's brother was Juan Arias.

I don’t descend from this family, but I saw the name, Pedro Ruiz de Haro, and on a whim, I began reading it. And a good thing: the first witness for Petronila de Haro is my g10 Cristobal Ordoñez, son of conquistador Diego de San Martin cc Elvira Ordoñez, and brother of conquistador Juan Michel.
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSD2-W7W7-8?cat=31792

Ordoñez gave his testimony on 19 Jan 1600, at his home in Guadalajara. He states that he had known Petronila for more than 48 years, and that he met her in Compostela, at the home of her parents, who were his “deudos y amigos” (!!!!!). He says that he first met Pedro Ruiz de Haro, secretario de la Audiencia Real de Guadalajara, some 69 years before (1531), when Cristobal was 7 years-old. This places his birth around 1524, making him 76 at the time of the inquest (he gives his age as “mas de 74 años poco mas o menos”).

He later states: “dixo ser pariente de Pº Ruiz de Haro de parte de su madre y de su padre segun se lo dijo su madre deste, siendo pequeño Por que su padre del dho Pº Ruiz de Haro q fue Secretario del Duque de Alburquerque y su abuela deste de parte de su padre q se llamava Ysabel de Haro hermana // parientes muy cercanos pero que eso no le ympide a decir la verdad..."

The page folds at that point in the sentence, and there might be a word or 2 missing, but it appears to say that his paternal grandmother, Ysabel de Haro, was sister of Pedro de Haro cc Francisca Muñoz, implying that conquistadores Pedro Ruiz de Haro and Diego de San Martin were 1st-cousins. Either way, we now know the name of Diego de San Martin's mother, and we know she is related to Pedro de Haro.

Question: it is known that Pedro Ruiz de Haro was from Peñaranda en Reinos de Castilla: which Peñaranda? De Duero, in Burgos? Or de Bracamonte, near Salamanca?

ANA MICHEL

Another testigo is Ana Michel, wife of Pedro de Enciso, and daughter of Juan Michel cc Catalina Mena. I had read that they had no known offspring, but this appears to disprove that. Ana Michel was born around 1550.
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSD2-W7ZB-2?cat=31792

Saludos!
Manny Diez Hermosillo

Hola a Todos,

Manny,

Another fantastic find! I descend from Pedro Ruiz de Haro and Leonor Arias through their daughter Francisca de Arias cc Alvaro de Bracamontes. Very cool to take this family back a few more generations.

If you look at the testimony of Bernabe Garcia, here - second paragraph on the first page, you can see that he calls out: ... y que a Juan Bautista de Haro hermano del dicho Pedro Ruiz de Haro que dijo aver conocido en Peñaranda de Duero.... There's only one Peñaranda de Duero which, as you already pointed out, is located in Burgos.

Best,

Daniel Serna Valencia

Hi Daniel,

After posting, I had gone back and read through the limpieza, and I saw Bernabe Garcia's testimony. I was coming back to update, when I saw your post. Thanks for picking up on that!

Carlos Peredo had posted on this family here: http://www.nuestrosranchos.com/en/node/21703

I'm glad I was able to assist, I'm also super happy to have a lead on Diego de San Martin: other researchers thought he may be from Portugal or Galicia (which is still possible), but now we know he has roots in Castilla la Vieja.

As always, thanks for your contributions!
Manny Diez Hermosillo

Manny, this is a fantastic find! Well done!

I am speechless. Does it say anywhere who Christobal's father is? I did not see it.

Thanks!

Sergio

Thanks, Sergio.

The names of Cristobal Ordoñez's parents don't appear in this limpieza; he was only explaining his relationship to Petronila de Haro - "le tocan las generalidades," which was a standard disclaimer made by witnesses, when related ​to the subject. This was to say that, "even though we are related, that doesn't make anything I say any less true."

​It's generally accepted that the parents of Cristobal Ordoñez were Diego de San Martin (conquistador de la Nueva Galicia) and Elvira Ordoñez.

Here he is again, appearing as a testigo in the orders for his son, Gabriel Ordoñez, 20 Sep 1600. Right image:
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-DJ5K-L?i=17&wc=SSKH-6TG

Saludos!
Manny Diez Hermosillo

Hey Daniel,

I have found 2 procesos against a widow named Leonor Arias, vecina de Compostela:

31 Jan 1570, Contra Leonor Arias por blasfema

22 Jan 1571, Contra Leonor Arias por sospechos de judia

It doesn’t take a leap of the imagination, when considering the limited population in Compostela in 1570, to deduce that this is the same Leonor Arias, who was married to Pedro Ruiz de Haro.

Cordialmente,
Manny Diez Hermosillo

Here is the index for the “Testificacion contra Petronila de Haro por tener un trozo de carne fresca de ahorcada,” dated 1621, in Guadalajara. It’s only the index, the original file unavailable online.

She’s probably the same Petronila de Haro who was married to Gonzalo de Morillo, and who was daughter of Pedro Ruiz de Haro cc Leonor Arias. I imagine that “carne fresca de ahorcada” is a Kosher method of food preparation, so this would appear to confirm suspicions that Leonor Arias was a Judaizante, or “Crypto-Jew.”

Saludos!
Manny Diez Hermosillo

PS Her’s is on the bottom of the page. Read the 2 records indexed before hers. Crazy…

As always, you have found a treasure-trove of awesome info. Thanks Manny!

I took a quick look at one of the procesos and I read that Leonor Arias was a viuda by the time of that particular proceso and she was very well off, (but not as well off as she deserved, which was one of the "incendiary" comments that caused her to get into trouble with the Santo Oficio).

I have a lot to go through, which I look forwar to. Thank you for passing this info along.

I've also been spending some time with the archive of the Mexican Inquisition. It's as vast as is it amazing. (It's a tragedy that it's not all available online.) I've been quite captivated with reading about the daily lives of folks from the 16th and 17th centuries, their way of speaking, what they ate, their customs, etc. One fascinating set of procesos I have run across is that of the English, Dutch, Irish, Welsh, Scotish sailors who sailed with "lost" armada of John Hawkins (As the Spanish called him, Juan Haquines). Most of the sailors never made their way back to their homelands and eventually blended in with the population, some of which were tried by the Mexican Inquisition for practicing their Protestant faith. Makes you wonder if one of our ancestors might have been from that "lost" armada. Very intriguing stuff!

Best,

Daniel Serna Valencia

You have peaked my interest … where can these records be viewed?

-Angelina-

> On Mar 19, 2018, at 11:32 AM, themexican@outlook.com wrote:
>
> As always, you have found a treasure-trove of awesome info. Thanks Manny! I
> took a quick look at one of the procesos and I read that Leonor Arias was a
> viuda by the time of that particular proceso and she was very well off, (but
> not as well off as she deserved, which was one of the "incendiary" comments
> that caused her to get into trouble with the Santo Oficio). I have a lot to
> go through, but, thank you for passing this info along. I've also been
> spending some time with the archive of the Mexican Inquisition as well. It's
> as vast as is it amazing. I've been quite captivated with reading about the
> daily lives of folks from the 16th and 17th centuries, their way of speaking,
> what they ate, their customs, etc. One fascinating set of procesos I have run
> across is that of the English, Dutch, Irish, Welsh, Scotish sailors who
> sailed with "lost" armada of John Hawkins (As the Spanish called him, Juan
> Haquines). Most of the sailors never made their way back to their homelands
> and eventually blended in with the population, some of which were tried by
> the Mexican Inquisition for practicing their Protestant faith. Makes you
> wonder if one of our ancestors might have been from that "lost" armada. Very
> intriguing stuff! Best, Daniel Serna Valencia
>

This sounds fascinating. Can you send me the link for this "proceso"? Thanks

________________________________
From: Research on behalf of themexican@outlook.com
Sent: Monday, March 19, 2018 11:32 AM
To: research@lists.nuestrosranchos.com
Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] Thanks Manny!

As always, you have found a treasure-trove of awesome info. Thanks Manny! I
took a quick look at one of the procesos and I read that Leonor Arias was a
viuda by the time of that particular proceso and she was very well off, (but
not as well off as she deserved, which was one of the "incendiary" comments
that caused her to get into trouble with the Santo Oficio). I have a lot to
go through, but, thank you for passing this info along. I've also been
spending some time with the archive of the Mexican Inquisition as well. It's
as vast as is it amazing. I've been quite captivated with reading about the
daily lives of folks from the 16th and 17th centuries, their way of speaking,
what they ate, their customs, etc. One fascinating set of procesos I have run
across is that of the English, Dutch, Irish, Welsh, Scotish sailors who
sailed with "lost" armada of John Hawkins (As the Spanish called him, Juan
Haquines). Most of the sailors never made their way back to their homelands
and eventually blended in with the population, some of which were tried by
the Mexican Inquisition for practicing their Protestant faith. Makes you
wonder if one of our ancestors might have been from that "lost" armada. Very
intriguing stuff! Best, Daniel Serna Valencia

Hello,

Yes, I can certainly post the link. Which procesos are you interested in, the ones for Leonor Arias or the ones regarding the lost armada of John Hawkins(For which there are dozens of procesos?)

Best,

Daniel Serna Valencia

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