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research Digest, Vol 3, Issue 19

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By Sheila P - Posted on 28 April 2006

Arturo and group:

In George Ryskamp's book, Tracing Your Hispanic Heritage, Chapter 12 is
dedicated to notarial records.

He says, on p. 437, "The most difficult problem confronting the researcher
using notarial records can be locating them." They can be kept on the
provincial (state) level, the district level, in local archives, and in
private, ecclesiastical or other government archives.

He also says (pp. 443-444), "All of the major historical archives will have
a list of the notaries whose records appear in their collections. In many
archives...these lists will be arranged in two separate sections. The first
will be an alphabetical listing of the notaries by surname, containing all
of the notaries whose protocolos appear in the archives...years such
protocolos cover, and...locality in which the notario...served. The
second...listing will be a geographical listing of all...towns from which
protocolos have been assembled in a particular archives. Under...each town
will appear the name of the notary or notaries from that town whose records
appear in the archives...with an indication as to the years...."

You have an abstract of a document at the Archivo General de la Nacion
regarding two notarios, but it is very possible that their protocolos, if
they survived, were kept on a different level than the Archivo Historico de
Jalisco.

This book is a great resource.

--Sheila P.

arturoramos wrote:

>I just found this going through the Archivo General de la Nacion index.
There was a discussion last week about finding out who were the escribanos
and how they worked. I am pretty sure that each escribano was given a
jurisdiccion where he was responsible, so this confirms that in the early
1700s there was an escribano assigned to Jerez y el Valle de Tlaltenango,
which at that time, I believe was considered a single municipal entity,
split in half by Colotlan which was under a military government under the
direct jurisdiccion of the Viceroy of New Spain, i.e. not Nueva Galicia:
>
>The escribano until 1741 was Manuel Antonio Suarez and after 1741 was
Nicolas Pardo y Figueroa. Neither of these names appears in the Archivo
Historico de Jalisco's list of escribanos.
>
>Clave de Registro 107653
>No. Grupo 45
>Grupo Documental Escribanos
>Fecha ABRIL 18 - NOVIEMBRE 16 DE 1741
>Volumen 12
>Expediente 13
>Fojas 301-312v
>Descripci?n RENUNCIA. AUTOS HECHOS SOBRE LA RENUNCIA DE DON MANUEL ANTONIO
SUAREZ, AL OFICIO DE ESCRIBANO PUBLICO Y DE CABILDO DE LA VILLA DE JEREZ Y
VALLE DE TLALTENANGO EN LA PROVINCIA DE LA NUEVA GALICIA, A FAVOR DE DON
NICOLAS PARDO Y FIGUEROA, EL CUAL SE LE REMATA EN 500 PESOS, CUYA TERCIA
PARTE PAGARA A LA REAL CAJA. VILLA DE JEREZ (Y) VALLE DE TLALTENANGO.
>

I have a feeling that these notarial records are either in the municipal archives of Tlaltenango or Jerez or perhaps in the state or municipal archives of Zacatecas. I think I had mentioned to the group that the municipality of Tlaltenango just recently disted off and oraganized its historical archives so perhaps these notario's protocolos are among those documents that will soon become available.

I am crossing my fingers.

=====================
Arturo and group:

In George Ryskamp's book, Tracing Your Hispanic Heritage, Chapter 12 is dedicated to notarial records.

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