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Meaning of "el moco" after someone's name

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By Don Animas - Posted on 09 August 2019

What is the meaning "el moco"?

I think it is like senior or junior, but am not sure.

Meaning of "el mozo"?

And which one out of the few Gonzalo Yanezes is Gonzalo Yanez el mozo?

Junior.

el mozo is junior and el viejo is senior

Typically its relative to the document you are reading so there is no answer to who el Mozo is. Most times it refers to a father/mother and son/daughter in the same document with the same name but it doesn't have to be that way. Sometimes it can be between a granparent and a grandchild or nephew uncle or similar relationship. I think the only thing you can actually be certain about when you see "el mozo" or "el viejo" is relative age.

Moco means junior. But that doesn’t mean that when a person named el moco is the younger person in a record. In at least one document el moco referred to the older person and the younger person was referred to as “ el menor”. What happened in this case was that there were three men with the same name. The “moco’s” father was “el Viejo”.

Of course "el mozo" would refer to the youngest of two people with the same name.

There is another possibility, an hilarious one. It could be a nickname, but I think it isn't very probable. If it were a nickname, it could be indeed "el moco" and not "el mozo".

(Wikipedia)Spanish has not used the symbol since an orthographic reform in the 18th century (which replaced ç with the now-devoiced z), but it was adopted for writing other languages.
ç (lower case, upper case Ç) "c cédille", the letter c with a cedilla; Usage notes . Ç is not considered a distinct letter, but a variant of C. It is used where a c pronounced /s/ occurs before a , o or u (due to etymology or inflection).

You will see it in some of the old Spanish text MOÇO

I understand that "ç" was pronounced as "ts" during the time it was employed in Spanish. I can't recall the source but perhaps someone might be able to contribute one.

I understand that "ç" was pronounced as "ts" during the time it was employed in Spanish. I can't recall the source but perhaps someone might be able to contribute one.

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