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General Digest, Vol 140, Issue 13

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By rmfpdx - Posted on 17 September 2017

Barbara,
Can you take a picture of the word and attach it to an email? Sometimes deciphering the style of writing is the trick.
Rick

> On Sep 17, 2017, at 4:05 AM, general-request@lists.nuestrosranchos.com wrote:
>
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> Nuestros Ranchos General Mailing List
> DAILY DIGEST
> ****************************************
>
> Today's Topics:
>
> 1. Job description question (rmfpdx@mac.com)
> 2. Google Earth VR (Joseph Puentes)
> 3. Re: Job description question (Barbara Andrews)
> 4. Re: Job description question (Barbara Andrews)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Sat, 16 Sep 2017 12:02:28 -0700 (PDT)
> From: rmfpdx@mac.com
> To: general@lists.nuestrosranchos.com
> Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] Job description question
> Message-ID:
>
>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8; format=flowed; delsp=yes
>
> Sorry, I don't have an Ancestry.com subscription and it appears you have to
> have one to view the site. Can you post the word you have doubts about here?
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Sat, 16 Sep 2017 19:32:31 -0400
> From: "Joseph Puentes"
> To:
> Cc:
> Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] Google Earth VR
> Message-ID: <029201d32f44$11ac6a30$35053e90$@rr.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
>
>
> Recently in Durham a city not too far from where I live opened a Virtual
> Reality Arcade. Awhile back I went in and tried it for the first time and
> thought it was cool but I'm not a gamer so most of the stuff didn't appeal
> to me, but nevertheless. . .
>
>
>
> So now some time went by and I needed to run into Durham and it happened
> that the VR Arcade was having a 50% off sale (regular is 20 bucks for 30
> minutes but this time it was 10 for 30 minutes and if you book two you get
> 70 minutes for 20 bucks). What appealed to me was that I was going to go in
> and spend my time exploring the Grand Canyon, Bryce Canyon, Yosemite, Lake
> Victoria, etc.
>
>
>
> So what happened. I went in and found myself spending the whole 70 minutes
> cruising around Colotlan, Santa Maria de Los Angeles, Las Animas, Huejucar,
> Tepetongo, Zacatecas, Aguascalientes then South to Tlaltenango and then just
> started tripping around. What I found that was different from my previous
> experience with regular Google Earth is that GE VR lets you "Fly" through
> the area from as close as you can zoom in all the way up in space. So it was
> just like I was taking a tour of the land my Ancestors traveled around at
> various times in the past. I'd go down to ground level (blurry) but I could
> look around 360 degrees and see the mountains and hills that they would see
> everyday. I could then fly up to the top of the mountains and look down at
> the various Ranchos I was visiting. To say the least I was quite impressed
> and enjoyed my 70 minutes traveling through Jalisco, Zacatecas and
> Aguascalientes
>
>
>
> If you all have a VR Arcade anywhere close to you ask if they have GE VR
> installed and consider checking the land of your Ancestors out as if you
> were flying in a small airplane (not quite but pretty close).
>
>
>
> Joseph
>
>
>
>
>
> Joseph Puentes
>
> Clean@h2opodcast.com
>
> http://h2opodcast.com/vsse.html
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Sat, 16 Sep 2017 23:25:48 -0700
> From: Barbara Andrews
> To: general@nuestrosranchos.com
> Cc: general@lists.nuestrosranchos.com
> Subject: Re: [Nuestros Ranchos] Job description question
> Message-ID:
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> Thank you,, these are Zacatecas' civil records. The record is a death record for my 2x great grandfather Juan Aguirre, Jan 1875. He was 30 at his time of death and it gave his job as either a "tagcador " or "tageador". I have not come across this word before. I'm assuming it's another word for "jornalero".
> Hopefully, someone has come across it in their research.
> Thanks for any help,
> Barbara
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Sep 16, 2017, at 12:02 PM, rmfpdx@mac.com wrote:
>>
>> Sorry, I don't have an Ancestry.com subscription and it appears you have to
>> have one to view the site. Can you post the word you have doubts about here?
>>

Barbara,

I have not come across this word before; but, recognizing that recording scribes very often misspelled words, let me try a little Spanish etymological game and start with another spelling: tajador

Tajo (an actual Spanish word): with 'tarea' actually being its synonym; and defined as 'work that is to be done in a limited time.'

Therefore, a 'tajador' could be a 'day-worker' --- the same as jornalero, a laborer that typically gets paid 'by the day.'

... and with that, I get a headache and now I need a beer.

Efrain Conrique

Efrain. Let me join you with a cerveza, too.

Paul Gomez
Rancho Cucamonga, CA.
Sent from my iPad

> On Sep 17, 2017, at 7:02 PM, conrique1@earthlink.net wrote:
>
> Barbara, I have not come across this word before; but, recognizing that
> recording scribes very often misspelled words, let me try a little Spanish
> etymological game and start with another spelling: tajador Tajo (an actual
> Spanish word): with 'tarea' actually being its synonym; and defined as 'work
> that is to be done in a limited time.' Therefore, a 'tajador' could be a
> 'day-worker' --- the same as jornalero, a laborer that typically gets paid
> 'by the day.' ... and with that, I get a headache and now I need a beer.
> Efrain Conrique
>

Efrain,
Sorry about the headache! The same word was used years earlier on his marriage record, only not as clear as the death records. But I think your right, I think it's just another way of saying daily worker. I'm just glad he wasn't making tacos for a living in 1875!!!
Thanks again for your help!
Barbara

Sent from my iPad

> On Sep 17, 2017, at 7:02 PM, conrique1@earthlink.net wrote:
>
> Barbara, I have not come across this word before; but, recognizing that
> recording scribes very often misspelled words, let me try a little Spanish
> etymological game and start with another spelling: tajador Tajo (an actual
> Spanish word): with 'tarea' actually being its synonym; and defined as 'work
> that is to be done in a limited time.' Therefore, a 'tajador' could be a
> 'day-worker' --- the same as jornalero, a laborer that typically gets paid
> 'by the day.' ... and with that, I get a headache and now I need a beer.
> Efrain Conrique
>

Efrain,
Sorry about the headache! The same word was used years earlier on his marriage record, only not as clear as the death records. But I think your right, I think it's just another way of saying daily worker. I'm just glad he wasn't making tacos for a living in 1875!!!
Thanks again for your help!
Barbara

Sent from my iPad

> On Sep 17, 2017, at 7:02 PM, conrique1@earthlink.net wrote:
>
> Barbara, I have not come across this word before; but, recognizing that
> recording scribes very often misspelled words, let me try a little Spanish
> etymological game and start with another spelling: tajador Tajo (an actual
> Spanish word): with 'tarea' actually being its synonym; and defined as 'work
> that is to be done in a limited time.' Therefore, a 'tajador' could be a
> 'day-worker' --- the same as jornalero, a laborer that typically gets paid
> 'by the day.' ... and with that, I get a headache and now I need a beer.
> Efrain Conrique
>

Barbara,It can also mean working a Tajo of land (a piece of land)Anna

From: Barbara Andrews
To: general@nuestrosranchos.com
Cc: general@lists.nuestrosranchos.com
Sent: Sunday, September 17, 2017 7:48 PM
Subject: Re: [Nuestros Ranchos] tageador

Efrain,
Sorry about the headache!  The same word was used years earlier on his marriage record, only not as clear as the death records. But I think your right, I think it's just another way of saying daily worker. I'm just glad he wasn't making tacos for a living in 1875!!!
Thanks again for your help!
Barbara

Sent from my iPad

> On Sep 17, 2017, at 7:02 PM, conrique1@earthlink.net wrote:
>
> Barbara, I have not come across this word before; but, recognizing that
> recording scribes very often misspelled words, let me try a little Spanish
> etymological game and start with another spelling: tajador Tajo (an actual
> Spanish word): with 'tarea' actually being its synonym; and defined as 'work
> that is to be done in a limited time.' Therefore, a 'tajador' could be a
> 'day-worker' --- the same as jornalero, a laborer that typically gets paid
> 'by the day.' ... and with that, I get a headache and now I need a beer.
> Efrain Conrique
>

"Tageador", "tajeador", el que hace tajos, cortes; es decir "carnicero". Al pronunciarse, tageador y tajeador, sonarán igual.
________________________________
From: General on behalf of conrique1@earthlink.net
Sent: Sunday, September 17, 2017 7:02 PM
To: general@lists.nuestrosranchos.com
Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] tageador

Barbara, I have not come across this word before; but, recognizing that
recording scribes very often misspelled words, let me try a little Spanish
etymological game and start with another spelling: tajador Tajo (an actual
Spanish word): with 'tarea' actually being its synonym; and defined as 'work
that is to be done in a limited time.' Therefore, a 'tajador' could be a
'day-worker' --- the same as jornalero, a laborer that typically gets paid
'by the day.' ... and with that, I get a headache and now I need a beer.
Efrain Conrique

Thanks, I have never seen that occupation, but I love learning, therefore I truly appreciate that this query was posted online and that many individuals volunteered and were willing to do the research and to provide their input.

-----Original Message-----
From: "Luis Bojorquez"
Sent: ‎9/‎18/‎2017 8:54 AM
To: "general@nuestrosranchos.com"
Subject: Re: [Nuestros Ranchos] tageador

"Tageador", "tajeador", el que hace tajos, cortes; es decir "carnicero". Al pronunciarse, tageador y tajeador, sonarán igual.
________________________________
From: General on behalf of conrique1@earthlink.net
Sent: Sunday, September 17, 2017 7:02 PM
To: general@lists.nuestrosranchos.com
Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] tageador

Barbara, I have not come across this word before; but, recognizing that
recording scribes very often misspelled words, let me try a little Spanish
etymological game and start with another spelling: tajador Tajo (an actual
Spanish word): with 'tarea' actually being its synonym; and defined as 'work
that is to be done in a limited time.' Therefore, a 'tajador' could be a
'day-worker' --- the same as jornalero, a laborer that typically gets paid
'by the day.' ... and with that, I get a headache and now I need a beer.
Efrain Conrique

Alicia, I agree and am very greatfull for the support this group has always given!! Research can be a difficult process so to have all this support is priceless!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 18, 2017, at 9:10 AM, Alicia Carrillo wrote:
>
> Thanks, I have never seen that occupation, but I love learning, therefore I truly appreciate that this query was posted online and that many individuals volunteered and were willing to do the research and to provide their input.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: "Luis Bojorquez"
> Sent: ‎9/‎18/‎2017 8:54 AM
> To: "general@nuestrosranchos.com"
> Subject: Re: [Nuestros Ranchos] tageador
>
> "Tageador", "tajeador", el que hace tajos, cortes; es decir "carnicero". Al pronunciarse, tageador y tajeador, sonarán igual.
> ________________________________
> From: General on behalf of conrique1@earthlink.net
> Sent: Sunday, September 17, 2017 7:02 PM
> To: general@lists.nuestrosranchos.com
> Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] tageador
>
> Barbara, I have not come across this word before; but, recognizing that
> recording scribes very often misspelled words, let me try a little Spanish
> etymological game and start with another spelling: tajador Tajo (an actual
> Spanish word): with 'tarea' actually being its synonym; and defined as 'work
> that is to be done in a limited time.' Therefore, a 'tajador' could be a
> 'day-worker' --- the same as jornalero, a laborer that typically gets paid
> 'by the day.' ... and with that, I get a headache and now I need a beer.
> Efrain Conrique
>

Tajador. El que taja , ó corta alguna cosa. [Diccionario de Autoridades. Año de 1737. Edición Facsímil. Real Academia Española. Editorial Gredos, S.A. Madrid, 1964]
________________________________
From: General on behalf of Barbara Andrews
Sent: Monday, September 18, 2017 12:01 PM
To: general@nuestrosranchos.com
Subject: Re: [Nuestros Ranchos] tageador

Alicia, I agree and am very greatfull for the support this group has always given!! Research can be a difficult process so to have all this support is priceless!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 18, 2017, at 9:10 AM, Alicia Carrillo wrote:
>
> Thanks, I have never seen that occupation, but I love learning, therefore I truly appreciate that this query was posted online and that many individuals volunteered and were willing to do the research and to provide their input.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: "Luis Bojorquez"
> Sent: ‎9/‎18/‎2017 8:54 AM
> To: "general@nuestrosranchos.com"
> Subject: Re: [Nuestros Ranchos] tageador
>
> "Tageador", "tajeador", el que hace tajos, cortes; es decir "carnicero". Al pronunciarse, tageador y tajeador, sonarán igual.
> ________________________________
> From: General on behalf of conrique1@earthlink.net
> Sent: Sunday, September 17, 2017 7:02 PM
> To: general@lists.nuestrosranchos.com
> Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] tageador
>
> Barbara, I have not come across this word before; but, recognizing that
> recording scribes very often misspelled words, let me try a little Spanish
> etymological game and start with another spelling: tajador Tajo (an actual
> Spanish word): with 'tarea' actually being its synonym; and defined as 'work
> that is to be done in a limited time.' Therefore, a 'tajador' could be a
> 'day-worker' --- the same as jornalero, a laborer that typically gets paid
> 'by the day.' ... and with that, I get a headache and now I need a beer.
> Efrain Conrique
>

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