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Tlaltenango Records

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By Alice_Campos - Posted on 13 November 2012

Hello Researchers,

Last night I tried to review the following microfilm: Tlaltenango de Sanchez Roman, Zacatecas, Matrimonios 1626-1723. I am disappointed in that the handwriting is almost illegible for the late 1620's (I don't know about the rest of the microfilm because I did not get far). Do these entries appear on the IGI? And are there any transcriptions or translations available of the records?

Thank you so much,

Alice

Alice just wanted to share something I do when reading a record that's unfamiliar or hard to read. I skip every 5 pages until the handwriting starts making sense and I start noticing similarities in wording and style, it's helped me a lot.. just sharing..
Linda in Boulder City, Nv.

________________________________
From: alice wissing
To: "research@lists.nuestrosranchos.com"
Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2012 9:17 AM
Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] Tlaltenango Records

Hello Researchers,

Last night I tried to review the following microfilm: Tlaltenango de Sanchez Roman, Zacatecas, Matrimonios 1626-1723. I am disappointed in that the handwriting is almost illegible for the late 1620's (I don't know about the rest of the microfilm because I did not get far). Do these entries appear on the IGI? And are there any transcriptions or translations available of the records?

Thank you so much,

Alice

It is very difficult to read. Ancestry.com used to offer tips on how to read Spanish old-style writing (maybe they still do). I just look/scan at the important parts of the entry and with experience, you begin to recognize the words. Remember that it was customary then to use a lot of abbreviations of names and used variations of spelling (such as local customs.

WHAT TO BE ALERT TO:  Expect many variations of name spellings.
"b" can be "v", i.e. Baldez for Valdez, Vanuelos for Banuelos, Vorrego for Borrego, Chabes for Chavez
"s" can be "c" or a “z“, i.e. Senteno, Centeno, Zenteno or Cilla for Silla
“j” can be “x”, Jimenez, Ximenez, Jaime Xaime, Javier, Xavier

“r” can be “rr”, Carrillo, Carillo, Cariyo,

“t’” is written the same height as the other letters and can be mistaken for an “r” or “c”
“y” is often a “ll” or even an “i“, i.e. Ayala, Allala, Mayorga, Maiorga, Montoya, Montolla

in many parishes the local custom uses the “ph” for “f” i.e., Phelipe for Felipe or Josepha for Josefa
sometimes the "h" is dropped off a name altogether. i.e. Haro, Aro, Holguin, Olguin, Hernandez, Ernandes, etc. OR the “h” is added where you don’t expect it. i.e. Hortis for Ortis or Hortega for Ortega.

Expect many variations of abbreviations, including the same names.
i.e. Hernd. for Hernandez,
Antto. for Antonio,
F.co or Franco. for Francisco.
Ma. for Maria
Gonz. for Gonzalez
Jn. for Juan
Xptabl for Cristobal
a “cross sign” for the surname “Cruz” or “Cristobal”

Jose Carlos de Leon

These early Zacatecas records are a real challenge!

The IGI is searchable from the Family Search website, unfortunately Tlaltenango marriages are available only from 1705, although the earlier ones have apparently been extracted according to the Parish Register index.

Joseph's guidance is very useful, but it will take some time to get used to the handwriting.

The more time you spend with these records, the better you will be able to discern what is written.

George Fulton
Pleasanton, CA

Sanchez-Castellanos

Try the book Familias Antiguas de Tlaltenango by Arturo Ramos, It has all the marriages 1600's.

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