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MADERA Family history of Huejuquilla El Alto, Jalisco, Mexico

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By MADERA_32 - Posted on 21 February 2010

Hi, I am a new member. I am research my family history. Madera. We are
from Huejuquilla El Alto, Jalisco, Mexico. A lot of Madera's there. But
there are a number of ranchos surrounding the pueblo. Three Rancho
Maderas:

San Jose De Maderas
Bajio de Maderas
Rincon De Maderas

These ranchos are very old. As I scrolled through rolls of films found
out that my Madera family was originally at Rincon de Maderas (Rancho de
Maderas) in the 1700's. Then in 1798, found birth of my great great
grandfather at a nearby rancho called, rancho Ximulco. Seems that my
ancestors moved from Rancho Rincon de Madera to Rancho Ximulco. And we
have been at Rancho Jimulco ever since.

But I am trying to research what part of Europe we originally came from.
I know that our pueblo, Huejuquilla El Alto, Jalisco, Mexico was founded on
March 23, 1573. The surrounding ranchos were in existence at the time.
And everyone was baptized at Parroquia de San Diego which is in the pueblo,
Huejuquilla El Alto.

My hunch is that we came from two places in Europe. Isla Madeira,
Portugal and Oviedo, Asturias, Espana.

Due to the discovery of silver in Zacatecas which is right there, since
our pueblo is on the border of northern Jalisco and Zacatecas........many
people from europe came to this area for the discovery of silver and to get
land grants (a rancho). Also note that there are a large number of indigenous Huichole that live in the area. So there was intermarrying with the Huicholes.

I found a map on the internet showing the routes that ships took from
Europe to Mexico. The spanish vessels embarked from Sevilla,
Spain.......traveled throught the islands of Portugal such as Azores,
Madeira and then through the Canary Islands.....before heading off to the
carribean islands such as Cuba and the Dominican Republic......then with
final destination to Veracruz, Mexico....

From there people traveled to Zacatecas and that is how we are in Huejuquilla El Alto there since the late 1500's.

The first Madera that was on the passenger list to the Indies (1500's) was Rodrigo
Madera (from Isla Madiera)...that landed in Dominican Republic. Don't
think I am descended from him since my family is in Mexico.

Also another clue is that our church, "Sanctuario Del Divino Preso" at
Huejuquilla El Alto, has a similar resemblance to the large church of San
Salvador in Oviedo, Asturias, Spain. I found out there are a lot of people
with last name Madera at Oviedo.

Note: When silver was discovered in Zacatecas. The silver went two
directions. Back to Spain with ships embarking from Veracruz, Mexico
and...........to China with ships embarking from Acalpulco on the Manila
Galleons that sailed through the phillipines and on to China in the trade
of mexican silver for chinese porcelain and spices.

But also with the discovery of silver in Zacatecas. There are a few
spices and herbs that grow naturally in our area of Huejuquilla El Alto,
Jalisco such as "Clavos" and other herbs that we still use in our
traditional foods. I am sure Spain collected those and used those to
trade with back in those days...

Another clue that I found is, "El Santo Nino De Atocha." By looking at the clothing you can get a clue as to what part of Europe we could have came from.

"El Santo Nino De Atocha" has Celtic Clothing, A Pilgrimage staff, water bottle and the Clam shell on the side of the chest. I investigated those items and found out that the Clam Shell is the "Saint James Clam Shell" of Santiago De Compostela, Galicia, Espana. If you look closely at this youtube video, you can see several of the items that is on "El Santo Nino De Atocha" of Fresnillo, Zacatecas:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnqpoELmDbM&feature=related

Galicia, Spain has Celtic influence which could explain the european features such as people with green eyes and blonde hair that our in are area in Mexico. That is another clue as to where some of the people in our area came from way back during precolombian times.

Saint James was an apostle of Jesus that traveled to Spain. Saint James and the apostles were suppose to have been at Capernaum, Israel

I know you are researching Madera but what's your name?

I really enjoyed what you shared and look forward to seeing more from you, thank you so much for sharing what you've learned.  It reminded me we research more than surnames, we are reclaiming a history of our peoples in Mexico..

thank you again.. whoever you are!
Linda in Marietta

________________________________
From: "zacatecano020@hotmail.com"
To: research@lists.nuestrosranchos.com
Sent: Sun, February 21, 2010 12:21:51 AM
Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] MADERA Family history of Huejuquilla El Alto, Jalisco, Mexico

Hi, I am a new member.  I am research my family history.  Madera.  We are
from Huejuquilla El Alto, Jalisco, Mexico.  A lot of Madera's there. But
there are a number of ranchos surrounding the pueblo.  Three Rancho
Maderas: 
San Jose De Maderas
Bajio de Maderas
Rincon De Maderas

These ranchos are very old.  As I scrolled through rolls of films found
out that my Madera family was originally at Rincon de Maderas (Rancho de
Maderas) in the 1700's.  Then in 1798, found birth of my great great
grandfather at a nearby rancho called, rancho Ximulco.  Seems that my
ancestors moved from Rancho Rincon de Madera to Rancho Ximulco.  And we
have been at Rancho Jimulco ever since.

But I am trying to research what part of Europe we originally came from.  I know that our pueblo, Huejuquilla El Alto, Jalisco, Mexico was founded on
March 23, 1573.  The surrounding ranchos were in existence at the time. And everyone was baptized at Parroquia de San Diego which is in the pueblo,
Huejuquilla El Alto.

My hunch is that we came from two places in Europe.  Isla Madeira,
Portugal and Oviedo, Asturias, Espana.

Due to the discovery of silver in Zacatecas which is right there, since
our pueblo is on the border of northern Jalisco and Zacatecas........many
people from europe came to this area for the discovery of silver and to get
land grants (a rancho).  Also note that there are a large number of indigenous Huichole that live in the area.  So there was intermarrying with the Huicholes.

I found a map on the internet showing the routes that ships took from
Europe to Mexico.  The spanish vessels embarked from Sevilla,
Spain.......traveled throught the islands of Portugal such as Azores,
Madeira and then through the Canary Islands.....before heading off to the
carribean islands such as Cuba and the Dominican Republic......then with
final destination to Veracruz, Mexico....

> From there people traveled to Zacatecas and that is how we are in Huejuquilla El Alto there since the late 1500's.

The first Madera that was on the passenger list to the Indies (1500's) was Rodrigo
Madera (from Isla Madiera)...that landed in Dominican Republic.  Don't
think I am descended from him since my family is in Mexico.

Also another clue is that our church, "Sanctuario Del Divino Preso" at
Huejuquilla El Alto, has a similar resemblance to the large church of San
Salvador in Oviedo, Asturias, Spain.  I found out there are a lot of people
with last name Madera at Oviedo.

Note:  When silver was discovered in Zacatecas.  The silver went two
directions.  Back to Spain with ships embarking from Veracruz, Mexico and...........to China with ships embarking from Acalpulco on the Manila
Galleons that sailed through the phillipines and on to China in the trade
of mexican silver for chinese porcelain and spices.

But also with the discovery of silver in Zacatecas.  There are a few
spices and herbs that grow naturally in our area of Huejuquilla El Alto,
Jalisco such as "Clavos"  and other herbs that we still use in our
traditional foods.  I am sure Spain collected those and used those to
trade with back in those days...

Another clue that I found is, "El Santo Nino De Atocha."  By looking at the clothing you can get a clue as to what part of Europe we could have came from.

"El Santo Nino De Atocha"  has Celtic Clothing, A Pilgrimage staff, water bottle and the Clam shell on the side of the chest.  I investigated those items and found out that the Clam Shell is the "Saint James Clam Shell" of Santiago De Compostela, Galicia, Espana.  If you look closely at this youtube video, you can see several of the items that is on "El Santo Nino De Atocha" of Fresnillo, Zacatecas:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnqpoELmDbM&feature=related

Galicia, Spain has Celtic influence which could explain the european features such as people with green eyes and blonde hair that our in are area in Mexico.  That is another clue as to where some of the people in our area came from way back during precolombian times.

Saint James was an apostle of Jesus that traveled to Spain.  Saint James and the apostles were suppose to have been at Capernaum, Israel

I sent you an email to give you my name.

Like to mention that Fresnillo, Zacatecas is located about two hours east of Huejuquilla El Alto, Jalisco (where we are from).

One roll of film that I was scrolling through was "La Cofradia" year 1608! of Huejuquilla El Alto, Jalisco, Mexico.

Presently in Huejuquilla El Alto, there is a rancho called, "La Cofradia." But when I browsed through microfilms of Huejuquilla El Alto, I found one called, "La Cofradia" of the year 1608. But at that time it was called, "La Cofradia De La Hermanidad." It was like a daily log......very interesting as to what was going on back then. Saw an inventory list of that time period. The person who was keeping a log at that time period was a Mayordormo by the name of Lazaro Medina.

In that inventory list it included items like "velas de baro, vino, corona de plata, pollos para los enfermos, costo para Semana Santa." That was an indication they celebrated Semana Santa back then.

But also there were logged visits of the Duenos de Las Minas De Fresnillo.

Also there was mentioning of Capitanes (Capitan Mayor y Capitan Menor), Capitanas (women captains?) I kind of had a hard time deciphering the writing.

But also in that inventory list it had the costs of each item. The monetary items they used were such as "PESETAS" and "TOMINES" What is a Tomine?

Anyway, I don't know what the function of a Cofradia was back then. But the Cofradia of today at Huejuquilla El Alto is just a ranch. My relatives are not from that Rancho.

Mines are from Rancho Jimulco, Bajio De Maderas, Rincon de Maderas which is also at Huejuquilla El Alto.

I too have family from the areas you describe. For what it is worth, I have repeatedly found the Madera family not only in Huejuquilla el Alto but in the nearby town of Mezquitic, Jalisco. The marriages and baptisms of the Maderas in Mezquitic date back to at least 1686 (Mormon film numbers 1164940 and 1164952). I suspect this is the same family since these towns were all frontier land back then. The elite (well-to-do mestizos, criollos, and the rare peninsular) all intermarried; distance was not a major issue but "class" was. It was preferable to marry a non-NAI. The ultimate prize for a criollo family was to marry a peninsular but it was OK to marry another criollo or well-to-do mestizo (re-labeled "espanol"), near as I can figure from my review of centuries of records in the local area and books that I have read. Bottom line: I think we are talking about the same Madera family, with branches thereof. Also by 1686, at least one of the Madera family members, Blas Madera, son of Joseph Madera and Josepha Basquez, was labeled as mestizo. He married into the espanol Avila family: wife Maria Theresa Avila, daughter of Miguel de Avila and Gertrudis de Robles, both "espanoles." The Robles and Madera family continued to intermarry for at least a century or two.

My Felgueres ancestors connected with Huejuquilla el Alto through a series of marriages in the mid-1750's. (I am from an illegitimate line that dates back to 1890). Bottom line here is that the first Felgueres in that area was Domingo Antonio Felgueres, who married Juana Bautista Martinez in 1794. Domingo was lieutenant governor of Mesqutic and came from Villaviciosa, Asturias, not far from the Oviedo, Asturias. I have visited Villaviciosa and took a day trip to Oviedo, the major city in the area and the city that you discuss. Furthermore, Oviedo has a history of mining. I am not sure about the Oviedo connection with the Villaciosa-based Felgueres, but the Felgueroso families and Felguera families are wealthy miners in the Oviedo area. The Dura Felguera company was started by a male Dura, who was an "indiano." An "indiano" is a person who went to the Americas, made a fortune, and came back to Asturias to live or better yet set up business that further prospered in Asturias. The Felgueres (later changed Felguerez) owned the haciendas in Valparaiso: del Valle, San Agustin del Vergel, Pena Blanca, El Tejujan, maybe others, in the late 1800's. The Felguerez family lost it all of course with the Mexican Revolution and the Cristeros wars.

With respect to your last comment about the Celtic culture, I need to tell you about a very nice lunch I had in Villaviciosa, Asturias a few years ago. The restaurant was referred to us by the locals, and that particular day we were one of the few costumers. Enjoying the afternoon and food, we ordered a nice wine and listened to the music. I could not believe my ears. I heard Celtic (Irish) music. I called over the waitress, who was also the owner of the establishment given the scarcity of customers, and asked her what kind of music was that!! She simply sighed and said, "It is our music. It is the music of old days, which the newer generations do not understand." The restaurant was situated in an apple orchard; the food, the wine, and the music are engraved in my memory. Yes, the area has strong Celtic roots, as does much of Northern Spain, where many of our ancestors came from. (The Basques and the Germans, as I have mentioned before in other comments, were brought to Mexico by the Spanish for their mining expertise).

Ed

Hi Ed! The culture of Spain has always fascinated me! The typical stereotype is bullfghting, wine, flamencoand fancy clothes. That is usually south of Madrid (though bullfighting is also popular in the north. My Spanish roots primarily are from Castilla, Asturias, Cantabria and Galicia. North of Madrid you;ll finda TOTAL dfferent culture! These are areas are like you said Celtico. The Irish are said to have come fromNorthern Spain along time ago. The English also have roots in Iberia and Germany. Sometimes peopleforget that the Spaniards from the north are usually (Gothic and Suevic blood from Germany). The history in general is fascnating. It is nice to know someone who also has Asturianu roots ours are from Cangas de Onis.
Regards,Daniel Mendez
To learn more about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saintsplease visit www.mormon.org

_________________________________________________________________
Hotmail: Powerful Free email with security by Microsoft.
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Daniel,

With respect to your comment that the Irish came from Northern Spain, I am not sure that I agree. The Celts settled both Northern Spain and the British Isles, but I am not sure there is good data that the sequence was Northern Spain then Ireland. For example, the myth that the Black Irish are Spaniards that were shipwreck victims from the defeated Spanish Armada is complete fantasy, given my historical sources.

Furthermore, the Felgueres/Villegas family in Huejuquilla el Alto also derive from the de los Santos Coy family via Saltillo. The latter Santos Coy family, along with the de la Garza Falcon family and others, were from Lepe, Huelva, Spain. Arguably, these families were conversos (ex-Jews). See the book "Conquistadores and Crypto-Jews of Monterrey" by David T. Raphael. I admit that Raphael lacks solid data.

In my historical and DNA reviews, there is nothing "pure" in any family of Mexico, especially our area of investigation. In my mind, Spain itself was the largest admixture of genes in Europe from 1000 BCE to 1492 ACE: Celt-Iberians, Phoenicians, Romans, Jews, Visigoths (Germans), Berbers, Arabs, and others.

Shuffle the deck = Spaniard.

Shuffle the deck once more (plus NAI) = Mejicanos.

Ed

According to Brian Sykes the British Isles were populated by Iberians 6,000 years ago. I am going to assume he worked with anthropoligists for his following statement "Before they arrived, there were some human inhabitants of Britain but only a few thousand in number." Both of these statements can be read at http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/this-britain/celts-descended-from-spanish-fishermen-study-finds-416727.html.
Also the Irish are more closely related to the Basques as far as Y-DNA is concerned.
"In Western Europe, R1b is present in Irish 90-98%,[44] Basques: 90-95%,[45] Bretons: 80-89%,[46] Scottish: 77%, Catalans: 75%,[45] English: 75%, Belgians: 70%,[31] Portuguese: 70%,[35] France (Strasbourg): 67.6%, France (Lyon), 66.7%,[47], Spanish (as a whole): 65%,[48] Italians (continental Italy): 40%,[49] Germans: 39%,[50] Norwegians: 25.9%,[51] Sicilians: 24.5%,[52] Maltese: 21.9%,[53] Swedes: 20%,[51] Sardinians: 19%.[54]"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R1b#Eurasia
Physical traits are yet another story. Hair color, skin color, and eye color were more dependant on climate. That is why the further north people lived the lighter they were. Therefore, all of northern Spain should have been lighter percentagewise, and they are. Maybe Galicians are even lighter as a percentage, than other northern spaniards, but there are light people all over Spain, especially northern Spain (Castilla y Leon, Asturias, Cantabria, País Vasco, and Cataluña.) Meaning the lighter people of our area could be from anywhere in Spain. As Daniel noted his ancestry is from all over northern Spain. Also notice that Irish are lighter than northern Spaniards as a percentage for the same reasons as previously noted. Therefore, the physical traits of Galicians, and other northern Spaniards, are somewhat independant of the physical traits of the Irish, even though most are of the R1b haplogroup.
Culture is also independant. Take for example that the main source of Castellano is Latin but the main source of Spanish DNA is not a Latin source. This also happened with groups we call Celtic. They aren't all related by DNA.
As far as the Y-DNA of Spain there is a new site that has the percentages of haplogroups in each area of Spain. http://www.iberianroots.com/Statistics/spain.html
The generalized Y-DNA of Mexico by percentages can be seen at http://www.ybase.org/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=1339&PN=3 It shows 13.27% Native American Indian but otherwise very similar to the haplogroups of Iberia, a majority being European. A majority of mt-dna for Mexico is Native American Indian. So Mexicans are generally half Spanish and half Indian.
I would be interested in seeing something similar to the Iberian Roots site for Mexico with the states and communities listed with their Y-DNA and also mt-DNA.

Armando

Thank you all for responding Longsjourney, Edward Serros, Mendezdelcamino, and Armando

Now Ed, I am very familiar with Mezquitic, Jalisco. We have been there several times as it is south of Huejuquilla. Because when we had to travel from Guadalajara to Huejuquilla or Huejuquilla to Guadalajara using the highway in the rugged mountains, we have to pass through Mezquitic. My Madera family is like this. My grandfather is name Antonio Madera born in July 1893 in Rancho Jimulco next to Huejuquilla, My great grandfather Calixto (Calisto) Madera was born in 1856 in Rancho Jimulco). I have been to their grave sites. Calixto Madera is buried next to his brother Julian Madera. Calixto died around 1923 and Julian died two years later. Calixto Madera had children with Maria Clemencia Madera. Maria Clemencia Madera is from Rancho De Los Maderas (Rincon De Los Maderas). She is the daughter of Benito Madera (Rincon De Los Maderas) and grand daughter of Marcelo Madera (Rincon de Maderas). I have found microfilms dating the year 1807 where census were done on Huejuquilla, and all the ranchos in the area. I saw that Marcelo Madera was the very first person listed on the list of the people living in Rancho De Los Maderas. There was a number of people listed on that census for that ranch. It was interesting to see the names of everyone living on each ranch and Huejuquilla

My great great grandfather was name Patrico Madera, "Espanol" born in Rancho Ximulco (Jimulco) in 1798, baptized in Church of San Diego of Huejuquilla El Alto. Everyone is baptized at Church San Diego. My great great grandfather is name Juan Venancio Madera, "Espanol" born in Rancho De Los Maderas (Rincon De Los Maderas) in the year 1764. He is the son of Francisco Madera.

I have included a map of the area. It includes two Rancho Maderas: San Jose De Los Maderas and Bajio De Los Maderas. But Rincon De Los Maderas is not on that map, but it there. As there are a number of other ranchos located there:

http://img251.imageshack.us/img251/6807/ranchomaderajaliscomexi.jpg

Now for Mendezdelcamino? I love the Flamenco (Spanish Tango) It is in my blood. Like this video of Alizee:

http://alizeeamerica.com/play/?v=9

In Zacatecas City, there is a bully ring. And sometimes the female models where those type of hats like in the above video of Alizee singing "La Isla Bonita"

Now for Armando, there are a lot of blue eye people in my dad's family MADERA.

Summary of my ancestors:

My grandfather is Antonio Madera, born July 1893 in Rancho Jimulco of Huejuqulla El Alto, Jalisco Mexico.

Calixto (Calisto) Madera, born in 1856, Rancho De Jimulco
Maria Clemencia Madera de Rancho De Los Maderas (Rincon De Los Maderas) of Huejuquilla, Jalisco, Mexico (Parents of Antonio Madera)

Patricio Madera, "Espanol" ( born 1792 or 1798?) in Rancho Ximulco (Jimulco) of Huejuquilla, Jalisco
Maria Dimas De La Paz (Parents of Calixto Madera)

Juan Venancio Madera, "Espanol" born 1762 Rancho (Rincon) De Los Maderas, Huejuquilla, Jalisco (Father of Patricio Madera)

Francisco Madera, "Espanol" Rancho (Rincon) De Los Maderas, Huejuquilla, Jalisco
Maria De Huizar (Parents of Juan Venancio Madera)

Side Note:

Maria Clemencia Madera de Rancho (Rincon) De Los Maderas, Huejuquilla, Jalisco is the daughter of:

Benito Madera who was born in 1836, Rancho (Rincon) De Los Maderas, Huejuquilla Jalisco and
Maria Estanislaus Munoz

Marcelo Madera, born in 1780, Rancho (Rincon) De Los Maderas
Juana Ramirez (Parents of Benito Madera)

Lasaro Madera, Rancho (Rincon) De Los Maderas
Micaela Perales (Parents of Marcelo Madera)
(Lasaro Madera/Micaela Perales are also the Padrinos of Juan Venancio Madera)

Map of Huejuquilla El Alto, Jalisco, Mexico:

http://img251.imageshack.us/img251/6807/ranchomaderajaliscomexi.jpg

Rancho (Rincon) De Los Maderas is not shown on the map but it is there.

Another thing is one time I was in Huejuquilla El Alto, Jalisco and I met someone who is also a direct descendent of our great grandfather Calixto Madera. Her grandmother is a daughter of Calixto Madera. We discussed about our ancestry. She told me that Patrico Madera, our great great grandfather was suppose to have worn one of those colonial hats.

Another time I met an old person who is old enough to know and met my great grandfather Calixto Madera. He gave me a physical description about what he looked like. He told me that Calixto Madera had blue eyes and a strong european look. At the cemetary at Huejuquilla El Alto he is buried next to his brother Julian Madera.

I connect with the MADERA family, but this is as back as I have been able to
go:
*

Descendants of Juan MADERA
*

1 Juan MADERA

.. +Ana MARTINEZ

2 Ignacio MADERA Martinez Born: in descendiente de Espanol

.... +Rita LIZAOLA Navarro Born: in descendienete de franceses

... 3 Paulino MADERA Lisaola 1854 - 1925 Born: 22 Jun 1854 in Ahuacapán,
Jalisco, México

....... +María FLORES Lisaola 1866 - 1927 Born: 18 Apr 1866 in Autlán de la
Grana, Jalisco, México

... 3 Magdalena MADERA Lisaola

....... +Tomás CABEZUD Santana 1874 - 1915 Born: Abt. 1874 in Jalisco

... 3 Cleofas MADERA Lisaola 1856 - Born: 26 Sep 1856 in Cavrito Autlán de
la Grana, Jalisco, México

... 3 Francisco MADERA Lisaola 1860 - Born: 05 Sep 1860 in El Sagrario,
Autlán de la Grana, Jalisco, México
I hope that I can make more connections with some of you.
Sylvia H Corona Cortes

I don't think all Mexicans "have" the same genetic ancestry, if you go to Mexicothey have a spectrum of colors from the darkest to the lightest. From personallyexperience and travel I notice the majority of the lightest Mexicans are in the north,west and Mexico, though they can be virtually anywhere in Mexico. I guess the concentration is because of the climate. A state like Jalisco is a very fair climate similar to that of Europe, hence I think this is why the Spanish had a desire to conquer that territory and settle. I think the mestizosare half Spanish and half native american. I have an interesting history, I have one black ancestor and 2 indio ancestors, 1 jewish ancestor and the rest are European, it shows Mexico to be a pluricultural country! It gets confusing once "se limpian" as it was known in colonial times like if mestizo married a white to make castizo and the castizo married another white then they become "full" espanol again.
Regards,DanielTo learn more about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saintsplease visit www.mormon.org

_________________________________________________________________
Hotmail: Free, trusted and rich email service.
http://clk.atdmt.com/GBL/go/201469228/direct/01/

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