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mulatos and consanguinity

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By rcordovamba - Posted on 24 September 2009

I just received today two copies of the marriage certificates of my great grandparents (from 1822 and 1797). I discovered that one couple were mulatos libres and another couple was mulato libre and espanola viuda and gives the name of the former husband instead of the names of her parents. One of these couples were related by fourth degree of consanguinity.

Was a mulato the offspring of Black and a Spanish?

Was an espanol someone who was born in Spain or is it possible that she was a criolla? I am trying to find her place of birth.

Is fourth degree of consanguinity a first cousin, offspring of our tios?

Rosie Cordova

Rosie:

Yes, a mulato would normally be the child of an español and a negra, though in latter years of the colony, the term came to mean many different mixes of black and European, which were earlier known as:

1. De Español y d'India; Mestisa
2. De español y Mestiza, Castiza
3. De Español y Castiza, Español
4. De Español y Negra, Mulata
5. De Español y Mulata; Morisca
6. De Español y Morisca; Albina
7. De Español y Albina; Torna atrás
8. De Español y Torna atrás; Tente en el aire
9. De Negro y d'India, China cambuja.
10. De Chino cambujo y d'India; Loba
11. De Lobo y d'India, Albarazado
12. De Albarazado y Mestiza, Barcino
13 De Indio y Barcina; Zambuigua
14. De Castizo y Mestiza; Chamizo
15. De Mestizo y d'India; Coyote
16. Indios gentiles (Heathen Indians)

As far as the term "español" in these certificates, it merely means that the person was of European descent, not necessarily born in Spain and in latter years, it could actually be someone who was of mixed race but appeared to be of European descent as the caste system seemed to be less accurate over time. Someone who was born in Spain would be referred to as "peninsular" or specifically "de los Reinos de Castilla" or whatever other country they were from and such a person would require a special permit to marry since it had to be ascertained that they were not married in their country of origin. You will definitely know when you stumble upon such a non-Mexico born ancestor.

mulatto means half white and half black.
espanol could be mean peninsular or criollo there wasnttwo much of a difference in terms for espanol. Its justpeninsular means borb in the peninsula.

Fourth means they were third cousins.
Espanol was used as white, we know that there were portuguese, irish, germans, italians english etc in Colonial Mexico, and all would have been listed as espanol regardless of european origin. Espanol (which means of Spanish descent) would be used as equivalent to Caucasian today.
-Daniel
_________________________________________________________________

While we are on the subject of the caste system .... I came across the term
"Yndia Lavoxia" the writing is very clear so I'm pretty sure that is what it
says. Can anyone shed some light on the meaning of Lavoxia? If it helps this
record came form the Tonila area of Jalisco.

-Angelina-

Angelina,

The term "Yndia Lavoria" means "indian laborer". In other words, someone
who worked as a laborer at a house or hacienda.

Bill Figueroa

----- Original Message -----
From: "Angelina Markle"
To:
Sent: Thursday, September 24, 2009 3:38 PM
Subject: Re: [Nuestros Ranchos] caste question - "Yndia Lavoxia"

While we are on the subject of the caste system .... I came across the term
"Yndia Lavoxia" the writing is very clear so I'm pretty sure that is what it
says. Can anyone shed some light on the meaning of Lavoxia? If it helps this
record came form the Tonila area of Jalisco.

-Angelina-

Thanks Bill - that's what I thought - just needed someone else to confirm my
suspicions. -Angelina-

-----Original Message-----

Angelina,

The term "Yndia Lavoria" means "indian laborer". In other words, someone
who worked as a laborer at a house or hacienda.

Bill Figueroa

Good Morning! Two topics I have run into several places. I'm going to refer you to http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04264a.htm scroll down to mode of calculation. Consanguatity is tricky to figure. Mulatto is usually half european.....however, sometimes son or daughter of someone who was half.

> ----- Original Message -----
> From: rcordovamba@aol.com
> To: research@lists.nuestrosranchos.com
> Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] mulatos and consanguinity
> Date: Thu, 24 Sep 2009 00:25:30 -0700 (PDT)
>
>
> I just received today two copies of the marriage certificates of my
> great grandparents (from 1822 and 1797). I discovered that one
> couple were mulatos libres and another couple was mulato libre and
> espanola viuda and gives the name of the former husband instead of
> the names of her parents. One of these couples were related by
> fourth degree of consanguinity. Was a mulato the offspring of Black
> and a Spanish?
>
> Was an espanol someone who was born in Spain or is it possible that
> she was a criolla? I am trying to find her place of birth.
>
> Is fourth degree of consanguinity a first cousin, offspring of our tios?
>
> Rosie Cordova

Dear Anglelina:
I have come across Indio Lavorio on the wedding document of Panisio Alviso in the late 1700's. I was told in means converted Indian or an Indian who had been converted to Christianity.

Maureen Bejar

THIS IS WHAT I  FOUND,

I THINKS THE REAL WORD IS        "INDIO NABORIO"     WHICH MEANS:        
 Indian of intermediate status between slave and free who was forced to work for a particular Spaniard or Spanish town.

YOU CAN FIN THIS TERM IN SAME OF THE EARLY  MANUSCRIPTS OF THE LOS ALTO'S HISTORY  TOWS,

HERE IS A GOOD DICTIONARY OF COLONIAL SPANISH TERMS:

http://www.somosprimos.com/spanishterms/spanishterms.htm

SALUDOS.

LUIS GONZALEZ JIMENEZ.

________________________________
From: "mytmo@netnitco.net"
To: research@lists.nuestrosranchos.com
Sent: Sunday, September 27, 2009 2:04:13 AM
Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] Indio Lavorio or India Lavoria

Dear Anglelina:
  I have come across Indio Lavorio on the wedding document of Panisio Alviso in the late 1700's.  I was told in means converted Indian or an Indian who had been converted to Christianity.

Maureen Bejar

Thank you Luis - I added that page to my favorites, it's a great reference.
-Angelina-

-----Original Message-----

HERE IS A GOOD DICTIONARY OF COLONIAL SPANISH TERMS:

http://www.somosprimos.com/spanishterms/spanishterms.htm

SALUDOS.

LUIS GONZALEZ JIMENEZ.

Luis,

The same reference you gave Angelina gives the meaning of "Laborio" as a
Hacienda worker or resident, which is the correct meaning.

Bill Figueroa

---- Original Message -----
From: "Luis Gonzalez"
To:
Sent: Sunday, September 27, 2009 10:29 AM
Subject: Re: [Nuestros Ranchos] Indio Lavorio or India Lavoria

THIS IS WHAT I FOUND,

I THINKS THE REAL WORD IS "INDIO NABORIO" WHICH MEANS:
Indian of intermediate status between slave and free who was forced to work
for a particular Spaniard or Spanish town.

YOU CAN FIN THIS TERM IN SAME OF THE EARLY MANUSCRIPTS OF THE LOS ALTO'S
HISTORY TOWS,

HERE IS A GOOD DICTIONARY OF COLONIAL SPANISH TERMS:

http://www.somosprimos.com/spanishterms/spanishterms.htm

SALUDOS.

LUIS GONZALEZ JIMENEZ.

________________________________
From: "mytmo@netnitco.net"
To: research@lists.nuestrosranchos.com
Sent: Sunday, September 27, 2009 2:04:13 AM
Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] Indio Lavorio or India Lavoria

Dear Anglelina:
I have come across Indio Lavorio on the wedding document of Panisio Alviso
in the late 1700's. I was told in means converted Indian or an Indian who
had been converted to Christianity.

Maureen Bejar

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