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Terms & Place Names In Records

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By Corrine Ardoin - Posted on 19 August 2008

Hi, Everyone:
I am currently going through a film for the marriage records of the San
Diego Parish of Huejuquilla El Alto, Jalisco for the 1800's. Well, I have
found a new term I have never run across before and wanted to ask if anyone
knows what it means. The term is "puesto." They will say so and so was
originally from and a resident "del puesto de San Antonio." I looked up the
word and the only thing that would make sense is that it means a military
post or a post of some kind. But, there is no other information given in
these records to indicate this is so. Also, this is
used interchangeably with a person being originally from and a resident "del
Hacienda de San Antonio." So, I'm wondering, is it a military post or a
Hacienda, or does "puesto" refer to something on this hacienda? Well, if
you may know, I would appreciate some info about this, because so many of
the place names given are refered interchangeably as "puesto de," "hacienda
de," and "rancho de."

Now, for names, this I have seen very frequently on all sorts of records
saying where someone was from or a resident of. These, I am assuming are
place names, but I am not sure if they are merely land forms or actual names
of towns, etc. Perhaps, they are the names of ranchos or haciendas? This
is not always said, but translated literally, they become something else.
For example, someone may be from "La Boquilla," which is not always in
capital letters. Well, the word "boquilla," supposedly refers to a feature
of a river canyon, but it could be a nearby rancho or little pueblo. It
never says as far as this name goes. Another one is saying that someone is
a resident of "La Cienaga," which can be both a place name or a land
description where this person may have a dwelling. So many people in
Mexico, even now, lived in little cliff dwellings and handmade shelters in
river canyons and so forth, I am only left to wonder if these are
descriptions of such places. But, I do realize that place names are given
based on the descriptions of them and hacienda names can be shortened in
common usage. Such as, instead of always saying to each other, "oh, he
lives on the Hacienda de la Boquilla," they would shorten it to, "oh, he
lives on the boquilla." Unless you were there, you are not going to know
this.

So, rattling on and on, I hope that in all of this, there is someone out
there who may enlighten me on this perplexing issue.

Corrine Ardoin
Santa Maria, California

On Tue, 2008-08-19 at 08:01 -0700, Corrine Ardoin wrote:
> Hi, Everyone:
> I am currently going through a film for the marriage records of the San
> Diego Parish of Huejuquilla El Alto, Jalisco for the 1800's. Well, I have
> found a new term I have never run across before and wanted to ask if anyone
> knows what it means. The term is "puesto." They will say so and so was
> originally from and a resident "del puesto de San Antonio." I looked up the
> word and the only thing that would make sense is that it means a military
> post or a post of some kind. But, there is no other information given in
> these records to indicate this is so. Also, this is
> used interchangeably with a person being originally from and a resident "del
> Hacienda de San Antonio." So, I'm wondering, is it a military post or a
> Hacienda, or does "puesto" refer to something on this hacienda? Well, if
> you may know, I would appreciate some info about this, because so many of
> the place names given are refered interchangeably as "puesto de," "hacienda
> de," and "rancho de."
>
> Now, for names, this I have seen very frequently on all sorts of records
> saying where someone was from or a resident of. These, I am assuming are
> place names, but I am not sure if they are merely land forms or actual names
> of towns, etc. Perhaps, they are the names of ranchos or haciendas? This
> is not always said, but translated literally, they become something else.
> For example, someone may be from "La Boquilla," which is not always in
> capital letters. Well, the word "boquilla," supposedly refers to a feature
> of a river canyon, but it could be a nearby rancho or little pueblo. It
> never says as far as this name goes. Another one is saying that someone is
> a resident of "La Cienaga," which can be both a place name or a land
> description where this person may have a dwelling. So many people in
> Mexico, even now, lived in little cliff dwellings and handmade shelters in
> river canyons and so forth, I am only left to wonder if these are
> descriptions of such places. But, I do realize that place names are given
> based on the descriptions of them and hacienda names can be shortened in
> common usage. Such as, instead of always saying to each other, "oh, he
> lives on the Hacienda de la Boquilla," they would shorten it to, "oh, he
> lives on the boquilla." Unless you were there, you are not going to know
> this.
>
> So, rattling on and on, I hope that in all of this, there is someone out
> there who may enlighten me on this perplexing issue.
>
> Corrine Ardoin
> Santa Maria, California

Hi Corrine, "Puesto", in my reference book says, " A place, post. or small town" From "Compilation of Colonial Spanish Tearms and Documents Related Phrases" Maybe this will help a bit. Tom S Aguinaga> Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2008 08:01:32 -0700> From: corrine@ardoin.us> To: research@nuestrosranchos.com> Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] Terms & Place Names In Records> > Hi, Everyone:> I am currently going through a film for the marriage records of the San> Diego Parish of Huejuquilla El Alto, Jalisco for the 1800's. Well, I have> found a new term I have never run across before and wanted to ask if anyone> knows what it means. The term is "puesto." They will say so and so was> originally from and a resident "del puesto de San Antonio." I looked up the> word and the only thing that would make sense is that it means a military> post or a post of some kind. But, there is no other information given in> these records to indicate this is so. Also, this is> used interchangeably with a person being originally from and a resident "del> Hacienda de San Antonio." So, I'm wondering, is it a military post or a> Hacienda, or does "puesto" refer to something on this hacienda? Well, if> you may know, I would appreciate some info about this, because so many of> the place names given are refered interchangeably as "puesto de," "hacienda> de," and "rancho de."> > Now, for names, this I have seen very frequently on all sorts of records> saying where someone was from or a resident of. These, I am assuming are> place names, but I am not sure if they are merely land forms or actual names> of towns, etc. Perhaps, they are the names of ranchos or haciendas? This> is not always said, but translated literally, they become something else.> For example, someone may be from "La Boquilla," which is not always in> capital letters. Well, the word "boquilla," supposedly refers to a feature> of a river canyon, but it could be a nearby rancho or little pueblo. It> never says as far as this name goes. Another one is saying that someone is> a resident of "La Cienaga," which can be both a place name or a land> description where this person may have a dwelling. So many people in> Mexico, even now, lived in little cliff dwellings and handmade shelters in> river canyons and so forth, I am only left to wonder if these are> descriptions of such places. But, I do realize that place names are given> based on the descriptions of them and hacienda names can be shortened in> common usage. Such as, instead of always saying to each other, "oh, he> lives on the Hacienda de la Boquilla," they would shorten it to, "oh, he> lives on the boquilla." Unless you were there, you are not going to know> this.> > So, rattling on and on, I hope that in all of this, there is someone out> there who may enlighten me on this perplexing issue.> > Corrine Ardoin> Santa Maria, California> -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --> Nuestros Ranchos Research Mailing List> > To post, send email to:> research(at)NuestrosRanchos.com> > To change your subscription, log on to:> http://www.NuestrosRanchos.com
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Hello Corrine,

Tuesday, August 19, 2008, 9:01:32 AM, you wrote:

> a new term I have never run across before and wanted to ask if anyone
> knows what it means. The term is "puesto." They will say so and so was
> originally from and a resident "del puesto de San Antonio." ...

> used interchangeably with a person being originally from and a resident "del
> Hacienda de San Antonio." So, I'm wondering, is it a military post or a
> Hacienda, or does "puesto" refer to something on this hacienda?

I've also seen this usage, also apparently interchangeable (based on,
say a marriage petition and the marriage certificate of the same
event) with hacienda. I assumed from some dictionary clues that it
probably means something like "place of" or "vecinity of". At first I
thought it might be a miss-transcription of pueblo or puerto, but I
finally concluded that puesto was correct.

--
Best regards,
Stuart mailto:stuartarms@gmail.com

Hello tom,

Tuesday, August 19, 2008, 10:40:13 AM, you wrote:

> "Puesto", in my reference book says, " A place,
> post. or small town" From "Compilation of Colonial Spanish
> Tearms and Documents Related Phrases" Maybe this will help a bit.

Can you give the complete information (Author, Title, pub) for this
source? I think I might like to find or obtain this reference.
--
Best regards,
Stuart mailto:stuartarms@gmail.com

Hi Stuart, Opp! Tearms should be "terms". I made my reference for my personal use. Its downloadable from www. somosprimos.com under "Spanish Terms" It's good information. Best regards, Tom Aguinaga at t_aguinaga@hotmail.com > Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2008 11:23:25 -0600> From: stuartarms@gmail.com> To: research@NuestrosRanchos.com> Subject: Re: [Nuestros Ranchos] Terms & Place Names In Records> > Hello tom,> > Tuesday, August 19, 2008, 10:40:13 AM, you wrote:> > > "Puesto", in my reference book says, " A place,> > post. or small town" From "Compilation of Colonial Spanish> > Tearms and Documents Related Phrases" Maybe this will help a bit. > > Can you give the complete information (Author, Title, pub) for this> source? I think I might like to find or obtain this reference.> -- > Best regards,> Stuart mailto:stuartarms@gmail.com> > -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --> Nuestros Ranchos Research Mailing List> > To post, send email to:> research(at)NuestrosRanchos.com> > To change your subscription, log on to:> http://www.NuestrosRanchos.com
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Hi Corrine!
 
I had found this term "puesto" in my search, it refers to a "venta" or "posta" which is a place to rest and feed travelers and horses and mules, merely a hotel. You could try to go to this link:
 
http://www.e-local.gob.mx/work/templates/enciclo/jalisco/mpios/14048a.htm
 
from where I extracted this:
"A mediados del siglo XVI, en que se suprimieron las encomiendas, aparecen la estancia y el rancho en Los Altos, y surgen los puestos o ventas que eran los albergues o posadas que se establecían en los caminos reales."
 
¿Could you translate the reference above for whom may need it? I am not good for the task. 
 
You will find useful a page in the web: Enciclopedia de los Municipios de México maybe there are more reference to such term.

--- El mar 19-ago-08, Corrine Ardoin escribió:

The term is "puesto." They will say so and so
was
originally from and a resident "del puesto de San Antonio." I looked
up the
word and the only thing that would make sense is that it means a military
post or a post of some kind. Best wishes Leticia Leon

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Here, Corrine, a reference for the term "venta" from "El Quijote de la Mancha":
 
“…y, al anochecer, su rocín y él se hallaron cansados y muertos de hambre; y que, mirando a todas partes por ver si descubriría algún castillo o alguna majada de pastores donde recogerse y adonde pudiese remediar su mucha hambre y necesidad, vio, no lejos del camino por donde iba, una venta, que fue como si viera una estrella que, no a los portales, sino a los alcázares de su redención le encaminaba. Diose priesa a caminar, y llegó a ella a tiempo que anochecía.
Estaban acaso a la puerta dos mujeres mozas, destas que llaman del partido, las cuales iban a Sevilla con unos arrieros que en la venta aquella noche acertaron a hacer jornada; y, como a nuestro aventurero todo cuanto pensaba, veía o imaginaba le parecía ser hecho y pasar al modo de lo que había leído, luego que vio la venta, se le representó que era un castillo …”

--- El mar 19-ago-08, Corrine Ardoin escribió:

Hi, Everyone:
The term is "puesto." They will say so and so
was
originally from and a resident "del puesto de San Antonio." Greetings from Leticia Leon

__________________________________________________
Correo Yahoo!
Espacio para todos tus mensajes, antivirus y antispam ¡gratis!
Regístrate ya - http://correo.yahoo.com.mx/

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