You are hereForums / Announcements and Events / Feliz 16 de Septiembre!

Feliz 16 de Septiembre!

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/lafamilia/nuestrosranchos.com/sites/all/modules/mailhandler/mailhandler.module on line 123.

By nc_coleman - Posted on 16 September 2007

Hola Primos! (Note: the rest of this message will be in English)

Well - was cruising the WEB - just looking - when I came across this site:

http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/group_detail.cfm?key=1253&gkey=100

and thought I would share. It isn't necessarily about our Ranchos area, but it is about our shared heritage - and since this is the time of year to recognize (nationally) our Heritage (whatever they choose to call it) I thought it might be of interest to you.
You also might be interested in this other Smithsonian site:

http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/educators/resource_library/hispanic_resources.html

How will you celebrate?? (I think Joseph will be looking for some MENUDO q;-) )

If you will be in Washington, DC during this time period, click on the Heritage Month Calendar for activities sponsored by the Smithsonian.

nc_coleman wrote:
> Hola Primos! (Note: the rest of this message will be in English)
>
> Well - was cruising the WEB - just looking - when I came across this site:
>
> http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/group_detail.cfm?key=1253&gkey=100
>
> and thought I would share. It isn't necessarily about our Ranchos area, but it is about our shared heritage - and since this is the time of year to recognize (nationally) our Heritage (whatever they choose to call it) I thought it might be of interest to you.
> You also might be interested in this other Smithsonian site:
>
> http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/educators/resource_library/hispanic_resources.html
>
> How will you celebrate?? (I think Joseph will be looking for some MENUDO q;-) )
>

Thanks and yes Feliz 16 de Septiembre! ! !

I didn't tell anyone but should now use this opportunity to spread the
good news. About 4 months ago Figen and I converted to Vegetarian. I
started looking at my work and position on the sustainability of the
environmental system we're living under and when folks ask what can I
do, "change a light bulb" wasn't enough of an answer for me. I saw how
Animal Factory Farming contributes 18% to green house gasses and after
seeing the film _the RAVE diet_ decided right there and then that to be
consistent with my position on their needing to be serious environmental
change I personally needed to stop eating meat (I don't think everyone
needs to take that position but I think a 50% cut minimum in this
countries meat consumtion is not too much to ask). Well I guess Natalie
unknowingly nudged me onto my soap box so I'll go ahead and step down.
Imagine that a Mexican vegetarian: But let me quote you a message from
Cesar Chavez who for 25 years was a Vegetarian:

"No podemos defender ni ser compasivos hacia los animales hasta que
dejemos de explotarlos en nombre del deporte, en nombre de la cinecia,
en nombre de la moda, y si, de explotar a animales en nombre de la comida.

La base de la paz es respetar a todos los seres".

Cesar Chavez, Vegetarismo por 25 anos, de su discurso al aceptar el
premio a su obra de por vida de "In Defense of Animals" en el 1992

thanks Natalie for the links and the opportunity,

joseph

ps: I can't imagine my meating eating family from Jalisco and Zacatecas
is amazed at my conversion. Our diets growing up, the typical meat
eating one was very heavy in the use of Manteca and I can still see my
mom making crispy tiny pig chicharones but that wasn't her goal she was
cooking them down for the Manteca.

She used it for her homemade flour tortillas, to refry her beans, to fry
eggs, well heck she probably used it for everything. She was taught to
cook for the family by my Grandmother Virginia Diaz Santa Maria (dob
1886) who was taught by my G-Grandmother Antonia Santa Maria Espinoz
(dob: 1862) born close to Tepetongo, Zacatecas.

====================

Joseph Puentes
http://H2Opodcast.com (Environment Podcast)
http://H2Opodcast.blogspot.com/ (Blog for above)
http://NuestraFamiliaUnida.com (Latin American History Podcast)

Joseph:

I applaud you on your conviction and resolve to make the conversion. I tried vegeterianism for a while in college and converted back.

My father, for health resasons, is largely a vegetarian as of several years back. He eats some fish and a bit of chicken but nothing else. He gets to eat nopales, frijoles, calabazas, elotes, huitlacoche, tunas and all sorts of other foods that he loves. The problem is more social since my mother and most of his acquaintances still eat menudo, pozole and tacos de carnitas. To my mother's credit she has started making chicken pozole.

Anyhow, in college I had a course on pre-Hispanic Mexican history and anthropology and we had a guest lecturer for a couple of classes on the historic gastronomy of Mexico and given that turkeys and dogs were pretty much the only domesticated animals in Mexico... yes Mexicans ate dogs... little ones that looked like Chihuahuas but fatter because they force fed them corn... the diet was largely vegetarian.

Beans, huitlacoche and fresh water algea and moss provided rich vegetarian protein sources.

They also ate mosquitoes (formed into bricks) and grasshoppers and
other bugs for protein. ¡Yummo,! as "Raquel" Ray would say!
I like vegetables a lot myself but can't give up my carne fix
completely.:) Marge:)

I moved over to the general list.

thanks Arturo and Marge. Can you imagine how they must have been eaten
by the mosquitos if they were also eating them in quantities large
enough to form bricks.

Arturo if your memory triggers the names of those guest lecturers I'd
love to contact them to see if they'd be willing to do a podcast on that
subject for the http://NuestraFamiliaUnida.com site.

thanks again very interesting reply from both of you.

dogs, huh, I betya a lot of Mexican folk would resist the idea that our
ancestors ate them. Then again a lot of folks are resistant to the idea
that the Mexican population has a significant African blood line mixed in.

joseph

====================

Joseph Puentes
http://H2Opodcast.com (Environment Podcast)
http://H2Opodcast.blogspot.com/ (Blog for above)
http://NuestraFamiliaUnida.com (Latin American History Podcast)

arturoramos wrote:
> Joseph:
>
> I applaud you on your conviction and resolve to make the conversion. I tried vegeterianism for a while in college and converted back.
>
> My father, for health resasons, is largely a vegetarian as of several years back. He eats some fish and a bit of chicken but nothing else. He gets to eat nopales, frijoles, calabazas, elotes, huitlacoche, tunas and all sorts of other foods that he loves. The problem is more social since my mother and most of his acquaintances still eat menudo, pozole and tacos de carnitas. To my mother's credit she has started making chicken pozole.
>
> Anyhow, in college I had a course on pre-Hispanic Mexican history and anthropology and we had a guest lecturer for a couple of classes on the historic gastronomy of Mexico and given that turkeys and dogs were pretty much the only domesticated animals in Mexico... yes Mexicans ate dogs... little ones that looked like Chihuahuas but fatter because they force fed them corn... the diet was largely vegetarian.
>
> Beans, huitlacoche and fresh water algea and moss provided rich vegetarian protein sources.

Arturo,

You said that Mexicans ate dogs. I had heard that Chinese ate dogs and cats, but I didn't know the ancient Mexicans did. I thought they kept dogs as pets because I have a book of photos of pre-Columbian sculptures and one of them is of a young woman nursing a small dog, one that looks like what we call "Chihuahua" dogs. That sculpture just grossed my husband out, but I found it intriguing. I thought perhaps the young woman was a substitute mother to the dog and I am sad to think she was fattening it up to eat it. I think the Aztecs ate snakes and other crawly things. I saw a cooking program about people in Mexico going back to the way the Aztecs ate, but I could never eat those things. When I go out, I will still order carne adobada tacos or pork pozole.

My husband and I both are starting to avoid red meat except when we go out due to the concern about cholesterol and mad cow disease, but we feel better eating mostly salmon and tuna and vegetables and very little chicken. We now also eschew rice, potatoes, pastas and white bread; instead we use whole grain cous-cous (olive oil and garlic flavored) and whole grain bread or sour dough bread.

Emilie Garcia
Port Orchard, WA ---
----- Original Message -----
From: arturoramos
To: announce@lists.nuestrosranchos.com
Sent: Monday, September 17, 2007 9:11 AM
Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] Vegeterian Mexican Cooking

Joseph:

I applaud you on your conviction and resolve to make the conversion. I tried vegeterianism for a while in college and converted back.

My father, for health resasons, is largely a vegetarian as of several years back. He eats some fish and a bit of chicken but nothing else. He gets to eat nopales, frijoles, calabazas, elotes, huitlacoche, tunas and all sorts of other foods that he loves. The problem is more social since my mother and most of his acquaintances still eat menudo, pozole and tacos de carnitas. To my mother's credit she has started making chicken pozole.

Anyhow, in college I had a course on pre-Hispanic Mexican history and anthropology and we had a guest lecturer for a couple of classes on the historic gastronomy of Mexico and given that turkeys and dogs were pretty much the only domesticated animals in Mexico... yes Mexicans ate dogs... little ones that looked like Chihuahuas but fatter because they force fed them corn... the diet was largely vegetarian.

Beans, huitlacoche and fresh water algea and moss provided rich vegetarian protein sources.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Navigation

Who's online

There are currently 1 user and 3 guests online.

Online users

  • arturoramos

Languages