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Rancho Los Aros (Haros) ties

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By Linniev2 - Posted on 16 August 2007

I looking for anyone with ties to Rancho Los Aros (Haros). My grandmother, Antonia De Haro, was from there and her family - De Haro - have been there since the 1700's. I have some informaiton abt the families from their but would like to find someone else researchin that area.
Rancho Los Aros is near Jerez (Ciudd de Garcia Salinas) Zac.

I have also been researching the ESQUIVEL line from pinos Zac.

Linnie

Linnie:

The Haros were perhaps the first Spanish (well really mestizo) family to permanently settle in Tlaltenango. I imagine that the majority of Haros are descendants of Juan de Miramontes and Maria de Haro y Saucedo who lived in Tlaltenango in the late 1500s and early 1600s. Some children took the name Miramontes, some Haro and some Saucedo so all of these families come from the same root.

Are you talking about el Rancho de los Haros that was part of Tlaltenango or is there a different rancho by the same name in Jerez? The two towns are close to each other and on opposite ends of the same valley and were historically administered as one entity so families moved back and forth, up and down the valley.

If you do a search for Miramontes or Haro on the site you will find lots of background information about the early origins of this family. There are a great number of people in the group researching some branch or other of this family as I imagine that 99% of people from the Tlaltenango area are descendants of the family.

However, genealogy is about working back one generation at a time and documenting each link, so you should begin by prociding the group with the detailed information about your grandmother's date of birth, name of parents, name of spouse, etc. I am sure there are members here who can help you research her ancestors. Tlaltenango records are very good and mostly indexed.

Arturo,

Apparently there are two Los Haros/ Los Aros. I got to visit the one in the district of Jerez in 2003. We went to the cemetery looking for family plots. Many of the people from El Durazno were buried there since it was closer than Jerez. While at the panteon Los Aros I found a family grave. I saw what looked like a nob and bent down and picked it up, much to my dismay it was a leg bone! That's when I was told that the graves were used for more than one person over a course of time, the bones from the previous burial were put to the foot of the grave and newly deceased person put in it's place. I reburied the leg bone in the grave, said a prayer for the ancestors and was more careful!

Linnie did contact me since I do have her family in my records from the district of Jerez. I have updated my files and put them on Rootsweb.com. Arturo, to update them on this site do I have to delete the present file or do you do that?

thanks for all your help, Linda in B.C.

arturoramos wrote:

Linnie:

The Haros were perhaps the first Spanish (well really mestizo) family to permanently settle in Tlaltenango. I imagine that the majority of Haros are descendants of Juan de Miramontes and Maria de Haro y Saucedo who lived in Tlaltenango in the late 1500s and early 1600s. Some children took the name Miramontes, some Haro and some Saucedo so all of these families come from the same root.

Are you talking about el Rancho de los Haros that was part of Tlaltenango or is there a different rancho by the same name in Jerez? The two towns are close to each other and on opposite ends of the same valley and were historically administered as one entity so families moved back and forth, up and down the valley.

If you do a search for Miramontes or Haro on the site you will find lots of background information about the early origins of this family. There are a great number of people in the group researching some branch or other of this family as I imagine that 99% of people from the Tlaltenango area are descendants of the family.

However, genealogy is about working back one generation at a time and documenting each link, so you should begin by prociding the group with the detailed information about your grandmother's date of birth, name of parents, name of spouse, etc. I am sure there are members here who can help you research her ancestors. Tlaltenango records are very good and mostly indexed.

To All,

I have been following recent discussions--particularly those related to the Herrera surname in Tlatenango--and would like to know if there had been?much migration from Tlaltenango to?Momax. My paternal grandmother was a Herrera, and while I'm sure the surname is common in this particular region the possibility of a connection between my grandmother's family and the Herreras being discussed is intriguing to me.

Tony Diaz

-----Original Message-----
From: arturoramos
To: general@lists.nuestrosranchos.com
Sent: Thu, 16 Aug 2007 9:24 am
Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] Rancho de los Haros

Linnie:

The Haros were perhaps the first Spanish (well really mestizo) family to
permanently settle in Tlaltenango. I imagine that the majority of Haros are
descendants of Juan de Miramontes and Maria de Haro y Saucedo who lived in
Tlaltenango in the late 1500s and early 1600s. Some children took the name
Miramontes, some Haro and some Saucedo so all of these families come from the
same root.

Are you talking about el Rancho de los Haros that was part of Tlaltenango or is
there a different rancho by the same name in Jerez? The two towns are close to
each other and on opposite ends of the same valley and were historically
administered as one entity so families moved back and forth, up and down the
valley.

If you do a search for Miramontes or Haro on the site you will find lots of
background information about the early origins of this family. There are a
great number of people in the group researching some branch or other of this
family as I imagine that 99% of people from the Tlaltenango area are descendants
of the family.

However, genealogy is about working back one generation at a time and
documenting each link, so you should begin by prociding the group with the
detailed information about your grandmother's date of birth, name of parents,
name of spouse, etc. I am sure there are members here who can help you research
her ancestors. Tlaltenango records are very good and mostly indexed.

Tony:

There need not be migration from Tlaltenango to Momax since Momax was basically one of the pueblos or ranchos of the Tlaltenango jurisdiccion and parrish until the late 1700s, just like Atolinga and Tepechitlan. If you look at a map you will notice that Momax is basically a stone's throw away from the present day city of Tlaltenango... even closer to some of the ranchos we have been discussing. Nowadays it is perhaps a 10 or 15 minute drive... back then it was perhaps a few hours horse ride or a half day's walk...

You should definitely try to find your grandmother's connection to this line. Do you have her birthdate and/or names of her parents?

Tony,

What other surnames are you researching from Momax?

Pat Silva Corbera

ripped65@aol.com wrote:
To All,

I have been following recent discussions--particularly those related to the Herrera surname in Tlatenango--and would like to know if there had been?much migration from Tlaltenango to?Momax. My paternal grandmother was a Herrera, and while I'm sure the surname is common in this particular region the possibility of a connection between my grandmother's family and the Herreras being discussed is intriguing to me.

Tony Diaz

-----Original Message-----
From: arturoramos
To: general@lists.nuestrosranchos.com
Sent: Thu, 16 Aug 2007 9:24 am
Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] Rancho de los Haros

Linnie:

The Haros were perhaps the first Spanish (well really mestizo) family to
permanently settle in Tlaltenango. I imagine that the majority of Haros are
descendants of Juan de Miramontes and Maria de Haro y Saucedo who lived in
Tlaltenango in the late 1500s and early 1600s. Some children took the name
Miramontes, some Haro and some Saucedo so all of these families come from the
same root.

Are you talking about el Rancho de los Haros that was part of Tlaltenango or is
there a different rancho by the same name in Jerez? The two towns are close to
each other and on opposite ends of the same valley and were historically
administered as one entity so families moved back and forth, up and down the
valley.

If you do a search for Miramontes or Haro on the site you will find lots of
background information about the early origins of this family. There are a
great number of people in the group researching some branch or other of this
family as I imagine that 99% of people from the Tlaltenango area are descendants
of the family.

However, genealogy is about working back one generation at a time and
documenting each link, so you should begin by prociding the group with the
detailed information about your grandmother's date of birth, name of parents,
name of spouse, etc. I am sure there are members here who can help you research
her ancestors. Tlaltenango records are very good and mostly indexed.

From my research the Ranch is North of Jerez on the road towards Fresnillo from Jerez into the mountains. All civil documents that were filed for Bith, Death and Marriage were filed in Jerez. I have not been there. However from a book listing Ranches from that area I understand that it is a working farm with a population of abt 800 plus. Several of the De Luna family still farm there. They married into the De Haro's and now live in St. Helena CA. but go back to harvest each year.
My mom had gone there several times. However she passed away before I was able to go on a trip there with her. I hope to go one day.
At the Main Family History Center in Salt Lake City The civil and church records are on micro film from Jerez and that is where I have gleened most of my information.
I have uploaded a GEDCOM file but I need to make to corrections.
Linnie

I replied to Linnie personally but wanted to add one of the features of Los Haros/Los Aros is the cemetery/panteon. It's centrally located for many rancho's such as El Durazno, Los Rodartes, Santa Rita and others so many of those families buried in Los Haros instead of Jerez as my family did. It's a small town on flat land as most of the ranchos are. They have fields and orchards around them. Some have cattle ranch's since they still raise bulls, I think for the bull fights since they seemed to be very agressive even when very young. Good roads much history still there.

Linda in B.C.

Linniev2 wrote:

>From my research the Ranch is North of Jerez on the road towards Fresnillo from Jerez into the mountains. All civil documents that were filed for Bith, Death and Marriage were filed in Jerez. I have not been there. However from a book listing Ranches from that area I understand that it is a working farm with a population of abt 800 plus. Several of the De Luna family still farm there. They married into the De Haro's and now live in St. Helena CA. but go back to harvest each year.
My mom had gone there several times. However she passed away before I was able to go on a trip there with her. I hope to go one day.
At the Main Family History Center in Salt Lake City The civil and church records are on micro film from Jerez and that is where I have gleened most of my information.
I have uploaded a GEDCOM file but I need to make to corrections.
Linnie

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