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translation help

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By longsjourney - Posted on 20 May 2007

In reseaching records I've found this phrase used often and don't understand the translation. Can someone who speaks Spanish translate and solve my mystery?

"originarios y vicenos de este lugar"

On the subject of reasons for a death I've often found "hydropecia or hidropecia" any ideas?

Thanks, Linda in Everett

"orginarios y vecinos de este lugar" literally translates as "natives and neighbors of this place"

Originario is a person who is originally from a place, so in this context it means that the people were born in the jurisdiccion, as opposed to having migrated there from somewhere else.

Vecino means neighbor which in this context means that they are residents of the jurisdiccion.

Someone who was originally from the place but had moved away would be originario de este lugar y vecino/feligres de "somewhere else"

Someone who had migrated to the jurisdiccion would be listed as originario de "somewhere else" y vecino de este lugar desde hace xxx anos... which would translate as resident of this place since xxx years ago.

thank you..

Linda in Everett

The correct spelling is: hidropesía

This is an "Abnormal accumulation of liquid in some
cavity of the organism." I'm not sure what hidropesia
would translate to in English.

Hope that helps.

-Esther

--- longsjourney wrote:

>
>
> In reseaching records I've found this phrase used
> often and don't understand the translation. Can
> someone who speaks Spanish translate and solve my
> mystery?
>
> "originarios y vicenos de este lugar"
>
> On the subject of reasons for a death I've often
> found "hydropecia or hidropecia" any ideas?
>
> Thanks, Linda in Everett

Nuptial blessings being withheld from a widow constitute Catholic cannon law. "By a law of ancient date which is still in force, this special benediction is withheld in all cases in which the bride has been previously mated."

Jaime

Thank you Jaime and others,

Now I understand it better.

> Nuptial blessings being withheld from a widow constitute Catholic
> cannon law. "By a law of ancient date which is still in force, this
> special benediction is withheld in all cases in which the bride has
> been previously mated."

--
Best regards,
Stuart mailto:stuartarms@gmail.com

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