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Trip to Jalisco, Aguas Calientes and Zacatecas

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By Visitor - Posted on 04 January 2007

Message for Helyn...Anna is aware of your request. We
will respond asap.

Message for Bill Figueroa,
In respond to your request please reference announce
Digest, Vol 7, Issue 13, dated Sat. 26 Aug 2006. Our
adventure begins from Guadalajara, and will follow the
route proposed by Alicia Carrillo in August 2006. I
will gather data, photos, books, hotels rates,
distance, fares-bus and cabs, best routes, etc....
Genealogical references, Municipal records. I will
indeed look into your request.

Jose Munoz

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

Message for José Muñoz,

Thank you for the information about your forthcoming trip to Mexico. I went
to Aguascalientes last March 30th, just days before the "Feria de San
Marcos" started in late April. It runs for a few weeks and at that time it
is difficult to book rooms in the major hotels. The fair attracts
visitors from all over Mexico. I stayed at the Calinda-Francia Hotel right
in the heart of town, and either walked or took taxi cabs for the first few
days. Then, I rented a car during the weekend (all the major companies rent
cars at the airport). Be sure to stop at the Tourist Office on the main
plaza and to take the city tour to familiarize yourself with the streets and
historical sites. On Saturday I drove to Rincón de Romos, Hda. del Pabellón
and the new San José de Gracia. The old town is underwater due to
construction of a dam and reservoir in 1927. I also visited several other
towns and ranches north of Aguascalientes. Then on Sunday I drove south and
visited Teocaltiche, Nochistlán, Mexticacán, and stopped at several other
towns along the way. Interesting country. On my next trip I plan to visit
Zacatecas and other areas further north, plus Calvillo and maybe Lagos de
Moreno. I have been to Guadalajara and other points west in Jalisco and
Nayarit (not of interest to our group, but my Ruiz de Esparza ancestors
moved to Tepic in the 1840s). I look forward to reading about your trip.

Bill Figueroa

----- Original Message -----
From: "jose munoz"
To:
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2007 8:48 PM
Subject: [Nuestros Ranchos] Trip to Jalisco, Aguas Calientes and Zacatecas

> Message for Helyn...Anna is aware of your request. We
> will respond asap.
>
> Message for Bill Figueroa,
> In respond to your request please reference announce
> Digest, Vol 7, Issue 13, dated Sat. 26 Aug 2006. Our
> adventure begins from Guadalajara, and will follow the
> route proposed by Alicia Carrillo in August 2006. I
> will gather data, photos, books, hotels rates,
> distance, fares-bus and cabs, best routes, etc....
> Genealogical references, Municipal records. I will
> indeed look into your request.
>
> Jose Munoz
>
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com

----- Original Message ----
From: Bill Figueroa bill_figueroa@usa.net

Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2007 12:20:16 AM

I have been to Guadalajara and other points west in Jalisco and
Nayarit (not of interest to our group, but my Ruiz de Esparza ancestors
moved to Tepic in the 1840s).

Bill, I think many of us would be interested in Tepic Nayarit. I believe the rules of Nuestros Ranchos are that you must have descendants from the three states but it does not limit the inclusion of history, data and ancestry from other Mexican states, on the contrary........many of us will probably connect our histories outside of Aguascalientes, Jalisco and Zacatecas.

Alicia

Alicia Carrillo wrote:
> ----- Original Message ----
> From: Bill Figueroa bill_figueroa@usa.net
>
> Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2007 12:20:16 AM
>
> I have been to Guadalajara and other points west in Jalisco and
> Nayarit (not of interest to our group, but my Ruiz de Esparza ancestors
> moved to Tepic in the 1840s).
>
> Bill, I think many of us would be interested in Tepic Nayarit. I believe the rules of Nuestros Ranchos are that you must have descendants from the three states but it does not limit the inclusion of history, data and ancestry from other Mexican states, on the contrary........many of us will probably connect our histories outside of Aguascalientes, Jalisco and Zacatecas.
>
> Alicia
>
>
I'll amen what Alicia says. Yes I would like to stay centered around our
target area of Jalisco, Zacatecas, and/or Aguascalientes, BUT people
moved from and to our target area. Kind of give a small small sense of
connection to our target area and discussion about other areas opens up
wonderfully. I just want to stay away from discussion about areas that
are totally off and mostlikely not related. Hey if you reach hard and
can bring some history of peoples that came from Zacatecas then you can
talk about almost anything.

For example. I've just uploaded on the http://NuestraFamiliaUnida.com
podcast project Dr. Francis X. Galan's discussion at the Los Bexarenos
monthly meeting (http://nuestrafamiliaunida.com/podcast/history.html#fg)
entitled *"Last Soldiers, First Pioneers: The Los Adaes Border Community
on the Louisiana-Texas Frontier, 1721-1779,"*

in the presentation he briefly mentioned that the soldiers came from all
over Mexico and in his list of places said Zacatecas. Well I wrote him
and he sent me this word file with three individuals (Joseph Antonio
Lazcano and Agustin Sanchez and another I think) that were from
Zacatecas and I'm giving the location of that Word file if you'd like to
see those people (http://www.nuestrosranchos.com/node/13828). Not much
information but just interesting and see how I took a distant subject
like the Spanish community at Los Adaes along the Louisiana/Texas border
in 1721 and related it to Zacatecas.

so once again go ahead and discuss other areas but just try a little to
make a distant connection to our area of research. then again on the
general@nuestrosranchos.com list discussion for other areas is allowed
but hopefully not for long and drawn out and multiple message threads.

joseph

===================

Joseph Puentes
http://H2Opodcast.com (Environment Podcast)
http://NuestraFamiliaUnida.com (Latin American History)

Message for Alicia Carrillo and Joseph Puentes,

Thanks for your message. It is interesting to follow the path of families that lived in an area for centuries, and all of a sudden decided to move away. The last of my ancestors born in Aguascalientes was my great grandmother María Josepha Frías Ruiz-de-Esparza. She was the daughter of Antonio Frías Jasso and Refugio Ruiz de Esparza. Antonio, born in Matehuala in 1808, was the son of José María Frías Garri, a native of la Rioja, in Spain, and Gertrudis Escobedo y Escalera, a native of Aguascalientes. They married at the chapel of hacienda del Pabellón de San Blas in 1803. My great grandmother was a direct descendant of three (yes, three!!) of Lope Ruiz de Esparza's children: Bernardo, married to Catalina Lozano; Lorenza, married to Luis Tiscareño de Molina; and María, married to Nicolás de Ulloa. Several generations later, the descendants of these three families intermarried, so although they are three separate genealogical lines they all start from Lope Ruiz de Esparza and Francisca Gabai. Needless to say, I am also a direct descendant of Pedro Romo de Vivar and Lorenza de Tiscareño (Aguascalientes), Juan López de Elizalde and Leonor Becerra y Sánchez de Mendoza (Santa María de los Lagos, Lagos de Moreno, Jalisco), Nicolás de Iñiguez y Ulloa (Mexticacán, Jalisco), Andrés de Cuevas and María de Benavides (Teocaltiche, Jalisco), Juan de la Escalera y Valdés and Juana Theresa Romo de Vivar (Aguascalientes) and many, many other early settlers of this area.

My great-grandmother Josefa Frías Ruiz de Esparza (aka Pepa) was born in Rincón de Romos on March 19, 1848. Her mother Refugio Ruiz de Esparza died of complications of childbirth, and was buried at the "camposanto" in Rincón de Romos March 25, 1848. She was 29 years old. After her death, her husband and children moved to Tepic, Nayarit, where Antonio had a sister Gregoria Frías de Merino. Antonio was a successful merchant who built a transportation business linking the Port of San Blas (near Tepic) to Guadalajara. San Blas was an important seaport in those days. All their children grew up and married in Tepic, but later moved to Guadalajara and other places where they thought would have better opportunities. My great-grandmother met young German engineer named Wilhelm Ludwig Strecker whom she married in Tepic in 1870. They lived there for about ten years, then moved to Guatemala City (my country of birth) where my great grandfather worked in the construction of the railroads in that country. Shortly after the rail line from the Pacific port of San José to the capital was inaugurated in 1884, the president of Guatemala Gen. Justo Rufino Barrios was killed in action at Chalchuapa, fighting to reunite the Central American states. Railroad construction came to a screeching halt, so my great grandfather joined Ferdinand de Lesseps in the construction of the Panama Canal. My great grandmother stayed in Guatemala City with four young children, one boy and three girls. The little boy was my grandfather Guillermo Strecker Frías, probably born in 1879 in Guatemala. I haven't found his baptismal record yet, but his burial record at the "Cementerio General de Guatemala" (1947) indicates that he was originally from Guatemala. The three girls Florence, Beatriz and Bertha Strecker Frías were all born in Tepic. Unfortunately, my great grandfather contracted yellow fever in Panama, and died of that horrible illness in Colón, where he was buried. His wife (the little girl born in Rincón de Romos in 1848) raised her children in Guatemala and never returned to Tepic. Needless to say that most of her descendants live in Guatemala, but some of us are scattered around the world. Josefa died in Guatemala City in 1921.

Sorry to bore you with this long story. The point I was trying to make is that this is only one Ruiz de Esparza line that generated people all over the world. Imagine how many more are in Aguascalientes, Zacatecas and Altos de Jalisco. I would love to know if some of you connect with this line, especially those with ancestors in our area of interest, including Tepic. As you probably know, Tepic was at one time "Séptimo Cantón de Jalisco" (Jalisco's 7th ward) and later "Territorio Militar". It became a mexican state around 1914. Incidentally, Tepic is a wonderful city, full of history and friendly people. I always felt very much at home there.

Bill Figueroa

Not boring at all in fact very very interesting. . .I envy the richness
of the details you have in your genealogy. I have dates and not nearly
so far back. thank you for sharing.

talking about Guatemala. . .one of your countrymen, Guillermo Castañeda
Lee did a podcast for the http://NuestraFamiliaUnida.com podcast
project. Have a listen: http://nuestrafamiliaunida.com/genealogy/other.html

thanks for sharing and who knows but we might need to open the door a
bit wider to include Tepic or would it be all of Nayarit? No my history
is lacking terribly in some areas. maybe we can have you send in more
material that would support the resolution to open the group to consider
Tepic (Nayarit). I've never been opposed to hearing a good argument and
the evidence to support it. Since this message really falls into the
category of research in our area of research I'm moving it over to the
research@nuestrosranchos.com list

http://www.elbalero.gob.mx/kids/explora/html/nayarit/index.html

The word Nayarit means the *Son of God who is in Heaven and in the Sun*.

Before it was called Nayarit, the state had other names like Seventh
District, Military District, Territory of Tepic.

When it was called the Seventh District, it belonged to the state of
Jalisco.

Nayarit is divided into *20 municipalities*.

_*the floor is open for discussion on whether or not we should include
Nayarit
in the Nuestros Ranchos group of research interest*
_

thanks again for your continued participation and interest in the group.
I believe is we can convince a few more of the members who seldom
participate to contribute every once in awhile we'll truly have a Unida
Familia de Nuestros Ranchos

joseph

ps: Would you consider telling your genealogy story in audio format? I
think it would make a wonderful contribution to the "Oral History" area
of the http://NuestraFamiliaUnida.com podcast project. [Note: this
invitation goes out to all members of the group. I know many of you have
very interesting stories related to your genealogy or to Mexican or
other Latin American Countries to tell. Time to step forward and tell
your story to the internet connected world. This is an open invitation
to all the members].

===================

Joseph Puentes
http://H2Opodcast.com (Environment Podcast)
http://NuestraFamiliaUnida.com (Latin American History)

Bill Figueroa wrote:
> Message for Alicia Carrillo and Joseph Puentes,
>
> Thanks for your message. It is interesting to follow the path of families that lived in an area for centuries, and all of a sudden decided to move away. The last of my ancestors born in Aguascalientes was my great grandmother María Josepha Frías Ruiz-de-Esparza. She was the daughter of Antonio Frías Jasso and Refugio Ruiz de Esparza. Antonio, born in Matehuala in 1808, was the son of José María Frías Garri, a native of la Rioja, in Spain, and Gertrudis Escobedo y Escalera, a native of Aguascalientes. They married at the chapel of hacienda del Pabellón de San Blas in 1803. My great grandmother was a direct descendant of three (yes, three!!) of Lope Ruiz de Esparza's children: Bernardo, married to Catalina Lozano; Lorenza, married to Luis Tiscareño de Molina; and María, married to Nicolás de Ulloa. Several generations later, the descendants of these three families intermarried, so although they are three separate genealogical lines they all start from Lope Ruiz de Esparza and Francisca Gabai. Needless to say, I am also a direct descendant of Pedro Romo de Vivar and Lorenza de Tiscareño (Aguascalientes), Juan López de Elizalde and Leonor Becerra y Sánchez de Mendoza (Santa María de los Lagos, Lagos de Moreno, Jalisco), Nicolás de Iñiguez y Ulloa (Mexticacán, Jalisco), Andrés de Cuevas and María de Benavides (Teocaltiche, Jalisco), Juan de la Escalera y Valdés and Juana Theresa Romo de Vivar (Aguascalientes) and many, many other early settlers of this area.
>
> My great-grandmother Josefa Frías Ruiz de Esparza (aka Pepa) was born in Rincón de Romos on March 19, 1848. Her mother Refugio Ruiz de Esparza died of complications of childbirth, and was buried at the "camposanto" in Rincón de Romos March 25, 1848. She was 29 years old. After her death, her husband and children moved to Tepic, Nayarit, where Antonio had a sister Gregoria Frías de Merino. Antonio was a successful merchant who built a transportation business linking the Port of San Blas (near Tepic) to Guadalajara. San Blas was an important seaport in those days. All their children grew up and married in Tepic, but later moved to Guadalajara and other places where they thought would have better opportunities. My great-grandmother met young German engineer named Wilhelm Ludwig Strecker whom she married in Tepic in 1870. They lived there for about ten years, then moved to Guatemala City (my country of birth) where my great grandfather worked in the construction of the railroads in that country. Shortly after the rail line from the Pacific port of San José to the capital was inaugurated in 1884, the president of Guatemala Gen. Justo Rufino Barrios was killed in action at Chalchuapa, fighting to reunite the Central American states. Railroad construction came to a screeching halt, so my great grandfather joined Ferdinand de Lesseps in the construction of the Panama Canal. My great grandmother stayed in Guatemala City with four young children, one boy and three girls. The little boy was my grandfather Guillermo Strecker Frías, probably born in 1879 in Guatemala. I haven't found his baptismal record yet, but his burial record at the "Cementerio General de Guatemala" (1947) indicates that he was originally from Guatemala. The three girls Florence, Beatriz and Bertha Strecker Frías were all born in Tepic. Unfortunately, my great grandfather contracted yellow fever in Panama, and died of that horrible illness in Colón, where he was buried. His wife (the little girl born in Rincón de Romos in 1848) raised her children in Guatemala and never returned to Tepic. Needless to say that most of her descendants live in Guatemala, but some of us are scattered around the world. Josefa died in Guatemala City in 1921.
>
> Sorry to bore you with this long story. The point I was trying to make is that this is only one Ruiz de Esparza line that generated people all over the world. Imagine how many more are in Aguascalientes, Zacatecas and Altos de Jalisco. I would love to know if some of you connect with this line, especially those with ancestors in our area of interest, including Tepic. As you probably know, Tepic was at one time "Séptimo Cantón de Jalisco" (Jalisco's 7th ward) and later "Territorio Militar". It became a mexican state around 1914. Incidentally, Tepic is a wonderful city, full of history and friendly people. I always felt very much at home there.
>
> Bill Figueroa

Hi Bill ,

My name is Welester and I have a friend named Lucio who is also a direct descendent of Ruiz de Esparza and a friend of his is a direct descendendent of Tiscareno anyway , sometime this coming week I am gonna help them register with NuestrosRanchos . I'm hoping that the three of you can connect .

Take care ,
Welester

> From: bill_figueroa@usa.net> To: announce@nuestrosranchos.com> Date: Thu, 6 Dec 2007 16:20:05 -0600> Subject: Re: [Nuestros Ranchos] Trip to Jalisco, Aguas Calientes and Zacatecas> > Message for Alicia Carrillo and Joseph Puentes,> > Thanks for your message. It is interesting to follow the path of families that lived in an area for centuries, and all of a sudden decided to move away. The last of my ancestors born in Aguascalientes was my great grandmother María Josepha Frías Ruiz-de-Esparza. She was the daughter of Antonio Frías Jasso and Refugio Ruiz de Esparza. Antonio, born in Matehuala in 1808, was the son of José María Frías Garri, a native of la Rioja, in Spain, and Gertrudis Escobedo y Escalera, a native of Aguascalientes. They married at the chapel of hacienda del Pabellón de San Blas in 1803. My great grandmother was a direct descendant of three (yes, three!!) of Lope Ruiz de Esparza's children: Bernardo, married to Catalina Lozano; Lorenza, married to Luis Tiscareño de Molina; and María, married to Nicolás de Ulloa. Several generations later, the descendants of these three families intermarried, so although they are three separate genealogical lines they all start from Lope Ruiz de Esparza and Francisca Gabai. Needless to say, I am also a direct descendant of Pedro Romo de Vivar and Lorenza de Tiscareño (Aguascalientes), Juan López de Elizalde and Leonor Becerra y Sánchez de Mendoza (Santa María de los Lagos, Lagos de Moreno, Jalisco), Nicolás de Iñiguez y Ulloa (Mexticacán, Jalisco), Andrés de Cuevas and María de Benavides (Teocaltiche, Jalisco), Juan de la Escalera y Valdés and Juana Theresa Romo de Vivar (Aguascalientes) and many, many other early settlers of this area.> > My great-grandmother Josefa Frías Ruiz de Esparza (aka Pepa) was born in Rincón de Romos on March 19, 1848. Her mother Refugio Ruiz de Esparza died of complications of childbirth, and was buried at the "camposanto" in Rincón de Romos March 25, 1848. She was 29 years old. After her death, her husband and children moved to Tepic, Nayarit, where Antonio had a sister Gregoria Frías de Merino. Antonio was a successful merchant who built a transportation business linking the Port of San Blas (near Tepic) to Guadalajara. San Blas was an important seaport in those days. All their children grew up and married in Tepic, but later moved to Guadalajara and other places where they thought would have better opportunities. My great-grandmother met young German engineer named Wilhelm Ludwig Strecker whom she married in Tepic in 1870. They lived there for about ten years, then moved to Guatemala City (my country of birth) where my great grandfather worked in the construction of the railroads in that country. Shortly after the rail line from the Pacific port of San José to the capital was inaugurated in 1884, the president of Guatemala Gen. Justo Rufino Barrios was killed in action at Chalchuapa, fighting to reunite the Central American states. Railroad construction came to a screeching halt, so my great grandfather joined Ferdinand de Lesseps in the construction of the Panama Canal. My great grandmother stayed in Guatemala City with four young children, one boy and three girls. The little boy was my grandfather Guillermo Strecker Frías, probably born in 1879 in Guatemala. I haven't found his baptismal record yet, but his burial record at the "Cementerio General de Guatemala" (1947) indicates that he was originally from Guatemala. The three girls Florence, Beatriz and Bertha Strecker Frías were all born in Tepic. Unfortunately, my great grandfather contracted yellow fever in Panama, and died of that horrible illness in Colón, where he was buried. His wife (the little girl born in Rincón de Romos in 1848) raised her children in Guatemala and never returned to Tepic. Needless to say that most of her descendants live in Guatemala, but some of us are scattered around the world. Josefa died in Guatemala City in 1921. > > Sorry to bore you with this long story. The point I was trying to make is that this is only one Ruiz de Esparza line that generated people all over the world. Imagine how many more are in Aguascalientes, Zacatecas and Altos de Jalisco. I would love to know if some of you connect with this line, especially those with ancestors in our area of interest, including Tepic. As you probably know, Tepic was at one time "Séptimo Cantón de Jalisco" (Jalisco's 7th ward) and later "Territorio Militar". It became a mexican state around 1914. Incidentally, Tepic is a wonderful city, full of history and friendly people. I always felt very much at home there.> > Bill Figueroa> -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- > Nuestros Ranchos Announce Mailing List> > To post, send email to:> announce(at)NuestrosRanchos.com> > To change your subscription, log on to:> http://www.NuestrosRanchos.com
_________________________________________________________________
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I have an ancestress, Lorenza Najar, who purportedly was originally
from Nayarit. She lived in 17th and 18th centuries in Zacatecas, where
she gave birth to 2 Zaldivar boys--one of whom was my direct ancestor,
Josef Zaldivar. So, yeah, let's include Nayarit (just for this
reason:)). Marge:)

On Jan 6, 2007, at 5:20 PM, Joseph Puentes wrote:

> Not boring at all in fact very very interesting. . .I envy the richness
> of the details you have in your genealogy. I have dates and not nearly
> so far back. thank you for sharing.
>
> talking about Guatemala. . .one of your countrymen, Guillermo Castañeda
> Lee did a podcast for the http://NuestraFamiliaUnida.com podcast
> project. Have a listen:
> http://nuestrafamiliaunida.com/genealogy/other.html
>
> thanks for sharing and who knows but we might need to open the door a
> bit wider to include Tepic or would it be all of Nayarit? No my history
> is lacking terribly in some areas. maybe we can have you send in more
> material that would support the resolution to open the group to
> consider
> Tepic (Nayarit). I've never been opposed to hearing a good argument and
> the evidence to support it. Since this message really falls into the
> category of research in our area of research I'm moving it over to the
> research@nuestrosranchos.com list
>
> http://www.elbalero.gob.mx/kids/explora/html/nayarit/index.html
>
> The word Nayarit means the *Son of God who is in Heaven and in the
> Sun*.
>
> Before it was called Nayarit, the state had other names like Seventh
> District, Military District, Territory of Tepic.
>
> When it was called the Seventh District, it belonged to the state of
> Jalisco.
>
> Nayarit is divided into *20 municipalities*.
>
>
> _*the floor is open for discussion on whether or not we should include
> Nayarit
> in the Nuestros Ranchos group of research interest*
> _
>
>
> thanks again for your continued participation and interest in the
> group.
> I believe is we can convince a few more of the members who seldom
> participate to contribute every once in awhile we'll truly have a Unida
> Familia de Nuestros Ranchos
>
> joseph
>
> ps: Would you consider telling your genealogy story in audio format? I
> think it would make a wonderful contribution to the "Oral History" area
> of the http://NuestraFamiliaUnida.com podcast project. [Note: this
> invitation goes out to all members of the group. I know many of you
> have
> very interesting stories related to your genealogy or to Mexican or
> other Latin American Countries to tell. Time to step forward and tell
> your story to the internet connected world. This is an open invitation
> to all the members].
>
> ===================
>
> Joseph Puentes
> http://H2Opodcast.com (Environment Podcast)
> http://NuestraFamiliaUnida.com (Latin American History)
>
>
>
> Bill Figueroa wrote:
>> Message for Alicia Carrillo and Joseph Puentes,
>>
>> Thanks for your message. It is interesting to follow the path of
>> families that lived in an area for centuries, and all of a sudden
>> decided to move away. The last of my ancestors born in
>> Aguascalientes was my great grandmother María Josepha Frías
>> Ruiz-de-Esparza. She was the daughter of Antonio Frías Jasso and
>> Refugio Ruiz de Esparza. Antonio, born in Matehuala in 1808, was the
>> son of José María Frías Garri, a native of la Rioja, in Spain, and
>> Gertrudis Escobedo y Escalera, a native of Aguascalientes. They
>> married at the chapel of hacienda del Pabellón de San Blas in 1803.
>> My great grandmother was a direct descendant of three (yes, three!!)
>> of Lope Ruiz de Esparza's children: Bernardo, married to Catalina
>> Lozano; Lorenza, married to Luis Tiscareño de Molina; and María,
>> married to Nicolás de Ulloa. Several generations later, the
>> descendants of these three families intermarried, so although they
>> are three separate genealogical lines they all start from Lope Ruiz
>> de Esparza and Francisca Gabai. Needless to say, I am also a direct
>> descendant of Pedro Romo de Vivar and Lorenza de Tiscareño
>> (Aguascalientes), Juan López de Elizalde and Leonor Becerra y Sánchez
>> de Mendoza (Santa María de los Lagos, Lagos de Moreno, Jalisco),
>> Nicolás de Iñiguez y Ulloa (Mexticacán, Jalisco), Andrés de Cuevas
>> and María de Benavides (Teocaltiche, Jalisco), Juan de la Escalera y
>> Valdés and Juana Theresa Romo de Vivar (Aguascalientes) and many,
>> many other early settlers of this area.
>>
>> My great-grandmother Josefa Frías Ruiz de Esparza (aka Pepa) was born
>> in Rincón de Romos on March 19, 1848. Her mother Refugio Ruiz de
>> Esparza died of complications of childbirth, and was buried at the
>> "camposanto" in Rincón de Romos March 25, 1848. She was 29 years
>> old. After her death, her husband and children moved to Tepic,
>> Nayarit, where Antonio had a sister Gregoria Frías de Merino.
>> Antonio was a successful merchant who built a transportation business
>> linking the Port of San Blas (near Tepic) to Guadalajara. San Blas
>> was an important seaport in those days. All their children grew up
>> and married in Tepic, but later moved to Guadalajara and other places
>> where they thought would have better opportunities. My
>> great-grandmother met young German engineer named Wilhelm Ludwig
>> Strecker whom she married in Tepic in 1870. They lived there for
>> about ten years, then moved to Guatemala City (my country of birth)
>> where my great grandfather worked in the construction of the
>> railroads in that country. Shortly after the rail line from the
>> Pacific port of San José to the capital was inaugurated in 1884, the
>> president of Guatemala Gen. Justo Rufino Barrios was killed in action
>> at Chalchuapa, fighting to reunite the Central American states.
>> Railroad construction came to a screeching halt, so my great
>> grandfather joined Ferdinand de Lesseps in the construction of the
>> Panama Canal. My great grandmother stayed in Guatemala City with
>> four young children, one boy and three girls. The little boy was my
>> grandfather Guillermo Strecker Frías, probably born in 1879 in
>> Guatemala. I haven't found his baptismal record yet, but his burial
>> record at the "Cementerio General de Guatemala" (1947) indicates that
>> he was originally from Guatemala. The three girls Florence, Beatriz
>> and Bertha Strecker Frías were all born in Tepic. Unfortunately, my
>> great grandfather contracted yellow fever in Panama, and died of that
>> horrible illness in Colón, where he was buried. His wife (the little
>> girl born in Rincón de Romos in 1848) raised her children in
>> Guatemala and never returned to Tepic. Needless to say that most of
>> her descendants live in Guatemala, but some of us are scattered
>> around the world. Josefa died in Guatemala City in 1921.
>>
>> Sorry to bore you with this long story. The point I was trying to
>> make is that this is only one Ruiz de Esparza line that generated
>> people all over the world. Imagine how many more are in
>> Aguascalientes, Zacatecas and Altos de Jalisco. I would love to know
>> if some of you connect with this line, especially those with
>> ancestors in our area of interest, including Tepic. As you probably
>> know, Tepic was at one time "Séptimo Cantón de Jalisco" (Jalisco's
>> 7th ward) and later "Territorio Militar". It became a mexican state
>> around 1914. Incidentally, Tepic is a wonderful city, full of
>> history and friendly people. I always felt very much at home there.
>>
>> Bill Figueroa

Hi Welester,

Thanks for your message. I look forward to getting in touch with your
friends that have connections to Ruiz de Esparza and Tiscareño families.

Regards,
Bill

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