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Jose Aguayo Ortega's Ancestors

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By arturoramos - Posted on 26 June 2006

Jose:

I saw the posting of your genealogy and I think you and I are probably related. I see you gave Del Real, Gonzalez and Mayorga all in your maternal ancestry going back to Atolinga. You list as your oldest maternal ancestors as:

Salbador Gonzales b. ca 1800 in Guadalajara, Jalisco?
m. Gertrudis Vayozga

However, seeing the combination of surnames, I had a suspicion and checked the towns where my Del Real, Mayorga and Gonzalez lines were in 1800 and I believe that I struck something. It looks like you have the wife's name a bit off, but otherwise it matches and makes sense given than the descendants were in the Tlaltenango and Atolinga area later on.

I am pretty certain that your Del Real lineage goes back to Juan Martin del Real who immigrated from Spain in the early 1700s and who is an ancestor of a number of us here in the Nuestros Ranchos group... He is mine in two different ways.

SALVADOR GONZALES
Marriages:
Spouse: MARIA GERTRUDIS MALLORGA
Marriage:
25 FEB 1805 Atolinga, Zacatecas, Mexico

Hola Arturo:
Your message is very intriguing! On my mother's grandfather's baptismal
record from Atolingo in Tlaltenango Parish, his paternal grandfather's name
is spelled Salbador. We all know about the typical errors in spelling of
names on such documents, so it is likely we are talking about the same
individual. On the same document, his wife's surname appears to be spelled
Vayorga. It is possible that the V is an M and, of course, the y is
interchangeable with Spanish ll. I look forward to much future
communication with you to compare our research.
Jose Aguayo

One of the things that one learns as one reads more and more records is that names were not as static historically as they are today. People would change names over time, adding or dropping a Jose or Maria from the front of their names, switching between their maternal and paternal surnames, etc.

Given those drastic changes, a spelling variation is nothing! You also have to remember that most people were illiterate and therefore only knew the way their names were pronounced and the priests would write them down as they heard them. Spanish language spelling was not as standardized as it is today so obviously Salvador becomes Salbador very easily given that "v" and "b" are pronounced exactly the same in Spanish.

There seems to be a pattern of switching Ms and Vs as well. I don't know if it is an issue of the letters looking alike when they are written or a pronounciation similarity issue. It is possible that regional pronunciation mixed these two sounds with one another...

I would suggest you order Film 0445085 and find out who these people's parents were from their marriage record.

My genealogy is all online at:

http://www.ramosfamily.org/nextgen

=====================
From: Jose Aguayo
Date: Tue Jun 27 10:32:48 CDT 2006
To: research@NuestrosRanchos.com
Subject: Re: [Nuestros Ranchos] Jose Aguayo Ortega's Ancestors

Hola Arturo:
Your message is very intriguing! On my mother's grandfather's baptismal record from Atolingo in Tlaltenango Parish, his paternal grandfather's name is spelled Salbador. We all know about the typical errors in spelling of names on such documents, so it is likely we are talking about the same individual. On the same document, his wife's surname appears to be spelled Vayorga. It is possible that the V is an M and, of course, the y is interchangeable with Spanish ll. I look forward to much future
communication with you to compare our research.
Jose Aguayo

Our Ancestors are always challenging us to find them. I have one ancestress whose names was Maria Aquilina Muñoz. I have found her name spelled with so many variations. Aquilina, Quilina, Tranquilina, Franquilina, Quirina, Querina, Aquina. She and her husband Guadalupe Olmos, Sigala had 12 children and with the birth of each child, her name would change slightly, and continued on into the birth of her grandchildren. In the beginning it was a challenge to figure out she was one and the same person but when I got to her grandchildren it all clicked that it was the same person with many, many spelling variations.

Alicia,
San Jose, Ca

Jose:

One of the things that one learns as one reads more and more records is that names were not as static historically as they are today. People would change names over time, adding or dropping a Jose or Maria from the front of their names, switching between their maternal and paternal surnames, etc.

Given those drastic changes, a spelling variation is nothing! You also have to remember that most people were illiterate and therefore only knew the way their names were pronounced and the priests would write them down as they heard them. Spanish language spelling was not as standardized as it is today so obviously Salvador becomes Salbador very easily given that "v" and "b" are pronounced exactly the same in Spanish.

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