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Introductions

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By makas_nc - Posted on 11 June 2006

There have been quite a few new members that have joined the list since
we moved to the new site.

If you haven't had a chance yet please do introduce your self on the
Research list: research@nuestrosranchos.com

Make sure to give us the Surnames in the specific areas within our
Target area of research that you are researching. If you have any
questions or want to make comments please feel free to do so on whatever
list would be appropriate:

(for General topics)
general@nuestrosranchos.com

(for Announcements)
announce@nuestrosranchos.com

(for Research topics)
research@nuestrosranchos.com

thanks,
joseph

ps: I sent this "Announcement" message to the Research List because I think Introductions should be sent to the Research list since they specifically will include
Surnames and areas of Research. Don't be intimidated if you can't figure out which list to mail your comments to. There won't be a "proper forum" officer ready
to pounce on you if you post to the wrong list. For those that want to help redirect messages to an appropriate list just change the address sent to the group before
clicking on "reply."

Linda:

This is very interesting but fits within the puzzle of Mexican history. Many people forget that Mexico was the principal endpoint on the Western side of the Pacific for trans-Pacific trade for hundreds of years. The Nao de China or Manila Galleons sailed between Acapulco and Manila for hundreds of years before the English or Americans established trade routes across the Pacific.

The remnants of this trade are everywhere in Mexico. Food: tamarind, mangoes, even mole (inspired by Asian curries). Thai and Korean cuisine likewise owes a lot to our good old Mexican chile. For some time the amount of silver exported from Mexico to the Philippines in order to maintain that far flung colony was so great that the Mexican silver peso was one of the main currencies of international trade in East Asia.

Another remnant of this was the substantial Asian immigrantion that came to the Mexican Pacific Coast over time. These immigrants melted into the mesitzaje but there are some historical accounts of Chinese and Filipino populations in early Mexico.

http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/publications/journals/shq/online/v022/n1/contrib_DIVL448.html

The ordinary population of Acapulco consisted of Indians and
Orientals, and of mestizos and mulattoes of every possible degree
of miscegenation. This nondescript lot were generically classed
outside of Acapulco as "Chinos." 19 Few Spaniards remained in
the town beyond the term of the feria, at which time the perma-
nent population of the place was greatly increased by the influx
of thousands from Mexico, Peru, and the Philippines. 20

Arturo, thank you so much for taking the time to share the article and your thoughts. My ethnic world, knowledge and curiosity expands daily on this genealogy site! Asians in Mexico before 1650 never even entered my thoughts..

Like Ernie I'm beginning to feel like a child of the world not limited by borders or surnames.. how wonderful! I haven't had my Castanon DNA done yet but nothing will surprise me now. I thought the biggest surprise for me and my family was when I found Mulato ancestors but Asian is even a bigger surprise.. I was also surprised that I didn't find anyone else with Haplogroup N in Gary Felix's site.. Nice to be the first.
Linda in B.C.

arturoramos wrote:

Linda:

This is very interesting but fits within the puzzle of Mexican history. Many people forget that Mexico was the principal endpoint on the Western side of the Pacific for trans-Pacific trade for hundreds of years. The Nao de China or Manila Galleons sailed between Acapulco and Manila for hundreds of years before the English or Americans established trade routes across the Pacific.

The remnants of this trade are everywhere in Mexico. Food: tamarind, mangoes, even mole (inspired by Asian curries). Thai and Korean cuisine likewise owes a lot to our good old Mexican chile. For some time the amount of silver exported from Mexico to the Philippines in order to maintain that far flung colony was so great that the Mexican silver peso was one of the main currencies of international trade in East Asia.

Another remnant of this was the substantial Asian immigrantion that came to the Mexican Pacific Coast over time. These immigrants melted into the mesitzaje but there are some historical accounts of Chinese and Filipino populations in early Mexico.

http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/publications/journals/shq/online/v022/n1/contrib_DIVL448.html

The ordinary population of Acapulco consisted of Indians and
Orientals, and of mestizos and mulattoes of every possible degree
of miscegenation. This nondescript lot were generically classed
outside of Acapulco as "Chinos." 19 Few Spaniards remained in
the town beyond the term of the feria, at which time the perma-
nent population of the place was greatly increased by the influx
of thousands from Mexico, Peru, and the Philippines. 20

Arturo,

I'm not sure where or if I'm supposed to post my Gutierrez YDNA but these are the numbers:

FTDNA Haplogroup

Haplogroup
Tests
N
-
Your Haplogroup has not been determined by a specific test. Use the Haplogroup link on the left to find out about it, and if we were able to predict it.

FTDNA DYS markers

We provide the actual scientific Allele values and DYS #'s for your results unless the markers were discovered at the University of Arizona and do not have a publication schedule. When that situation occurs we provide your results in "scores" to allow us to use the marker without compromising the discoverer until publication dates have been established.

We are pleased to report your results below:
Understanding your results.
Locus
DYS#
Alleles
1
393
14
2
390
23
3
19*
14
4
391
11
5
385a
11
6
385b
14
7
426
11
8
388
12
9
439

10
10
389-1
14
11
392
14
12
389-2
30
*Also known as DYS 394

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Arturo,

I find this very interesting, and I was wondering what my father was talking about concerning "chinos" in Mexico. When I was in high school and college I would invite Filipino and Chinese fellow students (young men) that approached me to our home. I think they thought I was Asian at first. My father later said, "what is wrong with you, bringing these Filipinos and Chinos here?" I told him I found them interesting, intelligent, and that we were interested in each others' ethnicity, etc. Then I asked him why he didn't like them, and he said, "Because they came to Mexico and started marrying our women". (My father was very provincial in his thinking despite having lived in the US since he was 10 years old in 1913). Was there a period of Asian immigration to Mexico around the turn of the 20th century that he would have heard about? He only lived in Jerez for 10 years, from his year of birth to 1913.

Emilie Garcia
Port Orchard, WA ---

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