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Memories of food

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By lunalatina1955 - Posted on 02 March 2006

Joseph,
 
I just loved your story.  It reminded me of one I would like to
share.
 
I was raised by foster parents from Jalisco, my foster mother was from
LaBarca while my foster father was from Tepatitlan.
 
He worked for Santa Fe, the graveyard shift, she was a stay-at-home
mom.  Our eating routine usually started with "leche con pan dulce" for
breakfast.  We came home to a hot meal every day (she wasn't the best cook,
but it was always good and substantial).  When we got home from school, we
did chores, homework, etc.  Then she would serve her husband his own meal
(always different from what she served us or herself).  We would always
wonder why he got the "special" looking stuff, but dared not ask.  Later,
we would eat something light, like tostadas, and right before bed we would have
our pan dulce with our leche.
 
One night, when my foster father was working and my brothers were out
playing (I was never allowed to go out and play, as I had to be chaperoned at
all times), I saw her eating fish.  She was eating it with such delight,
and I asked to taste it.  She let me taste it, but I did not like it. 
This was one of the first times that I had ever seen her eat or
prepare fish - she said it reminded her of childhood, but did not
elaborate.
 
Now that left an impression upon me, because fish was expensive and not
necessarily readily available in Chicago (fresh) during those days, nor did we
ever get fish when we went to Jalisco visiting family.  Just recently, I
learned that her father was a fisherman - he used to fish at the Laguna de
Chapala.  It saddened me that she would prepare special meals for
her husband and separate meals for herself and us. 
 
I am wondering if anyone else had a similar ritual when they grew up? 
Can anyone tell me why pan dulce was served right before bedtime and a light
supper provided? 
 
Esperanza

Esperanza,
I'm not sure if or how this might connect to your story, but my maternal grandparents, who were from Sinaloa (my Nana was from Mocorito Sinaloa, my Tata was born in Batopila, Chihuahua, but raised in Sinaloa) had a similar routine.  We always had pan dulce in the house and I remember that my Tata always ate a breakfast of pan dulce, slices of cheese and his cafesito every morning.  If there was ever a variation from this it was the addition of some frijolitos now and then.  We children (lots of cousins) were fed avena (oatmeal), toast with butter and usually orange juice.  Lunch was generally the biggest meals and included some type of caldo (soup-homade) or meat or fish, vegetables (usually fresh cooked), and milk.  Dinner was generally served around 4:00  p.m. and consisted of a small portion of meat or fish, fresh cooked vegetables, a salad (usually lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers) and tea made fresh from avacado leaves or lemmon grass
(not to mention yerba buena).  Before going to bed my Nana would always serve jello, into which mixed fruit or sliced bananas had been added.  Although the meals my Tata ate weren't always different from ours, my grandfather always ate seperately, but I never thought to ask why.  Back then we would have Sunday dinner at my grandparent's home (8 daughter's, their husbands, and their children-each daghter had at least three or more kids), and even then dinner was served to the men separately.

Olivia Jaurequi-Reyes
Rowland Heights, CA


latina1955@aol.com wrote: Joseph,   I just loved your
story.  It reminded me of one I would like to share.   I was raised by foster parents from Jalisco, my foster mother was from LaBarca while my foster father was from Tepatitlan.   He worked for Santa Fe, the graveyard shift, she was a stay-at-home mom.  Our eating routine usually started with "leche con pan dulce" for breakfast.  We came home to a hot meal every day (she wasn't the best cook, but it was always good and substantial).  When we got home from school, we did chores, homework, etc.  Then she would serve her husband his own meal (always different from what she served us or herself).  We would always wonder why he got the "special" looking stuff, but dared not ask.  Later, we would eat something light, like tostadas, and right before bed we would have our pan dulce with our leche.   One night, when my foster father was working and my brothers
were out playing (I was never allowed to go out and play, as I had to be chaperoned at all times), I saw her eating fish.  She was eating it with such delight, and I asked to taste it.  She let me taste it, but I did not like it.  This was one of the first times that I had ever seen her eat or prepare fish - she said it reminded her of childhood, but did not elaborate.   Now that left an impression upon me, because fish was expensive and not necessarily readily available in Chicago (fresh) during those days, nor did we ever get fish when we went to Jalisco visiting family.  Just recently, I learned that her father was a fisherman - he used to fish at the Laguna de Chapala.  It saddened me that she would prepare special meals for her husband and separate meals for herself and us.    I am wondering if anyone else had a similar ritual when they grew up?  Can anyone tell
me why pan dulce was served right before bedtime and a light supper provided?    Esperanza

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Esperanza,
 
About the light dinners:  I think that in Mexico the main meal is
between 1-3 pm, so no one has much of an appetite in the evening, but in order
not to go to bed hungry, they would have something like the English Tea.  I
remember my husband's aunts in Mexico City saying we were going to have "Cake"
and coffee and liquers in the evening.  My husband says that as children
they were served hot chocolate and wedges of pan dulce around 7:30 or 8:00 pm
right before they went to bed.  In the morning they ate "tortas"
(omelettes) and coffee with lots of sugar and milk.  My husband still likes
his milk and sugar with a little bit of coffee, ha, ha.,  Adults stayed up
late.  I remember I could hear guitars all night long everywhere in Mexico
that we went.
 
About the feeding of the menfolk:  In the old days, women were mostly
stay-at-home moms whose job was to cater to the men.  If there was meat or
anything special for the main meal around noon the men were served first and
only what they liked exactly as they liked it - no trying out new recipes on
them!--  since they had to go back to work.  Women and children ate
what was left, or ate something else like a light dinner. My mother
always served men guests first.  That was the custom. 
 
Emilie Garcia
Port Orchard, WA --- 

----- Original Message -----
From: latina1955@aol.com
To: ranchos@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2006 3:13
PM
Subject: Re: [ranchos] Memories of
food


Joseph,
 
I just loved your story.  It reminded me of one I would like to
share.
 
I was raised by foster parents from Jalisco, my foster mother was from
LaBarca while my foster father was from Tepatitlan.
 
He worked for Santa Fe, the graveyard shift, she was a stay-at-home
mom.  Our eating routine usually started with "leche con pan dulce" for
breakfast.  We came home to a hot meal every day (she wasn't the best
cook, but it was always good and substantial).  When we got home from
school, we did chores, homework, etc.  Then she would serve her husband
his own meal (always different from what she served us or herself).  We
would always wonder why he got the "special" looking stuff, but dared not
ask.  Later, we would eat something light, like tostadas, and right
before bed we would have our pan dulce with our leche.
 
One night, when my foster father was working and my brothers were
out playing (I was never allowed to go out and play, as I had to be chaperoned
at all times), I saw her eating fish.  She was eating it with such
delight, and I asked to taste it.  She let me taste it, but I did not
like it.  This was one of the first times that I had ever seen
her eat or prepare fish - she said it reminded her of childhood, but did not
elaborate.
 
Now that left an impression upon me, because fish was expensive and not
necessarily readily available in Chicago (fresh) during those days, nor did we
ever get fish when we went to Jalisco visiting family.  Just recently, I
learned that her father was a fisherman - he used to fish at the Laguna de
Chapala.  It saddened me that she would prepare special meals for
her husband and separate meals for herself and us. 
 
I am wondering if anyone else had a similar ritual when they grew
up?  Can anyone tell me why pan dulce was served right before bedtime and
a light supper provided? 
 
Esperanza

Janet,
 
I have that Frida Kahlo book too.  I just love it.  I would love
to have a little blue house decorated just like hers, but my husband, like his
aunts in Mexico, hates anything "ethnic" in décor.  He likes only
contemporary.  My sister is so lucky.  Not that she is a widow, but
that she is able to decorate her house just like Frida's with Diego Rivera
reproductions and some of Frida's art too. She and I are always on the lookout
for items to duplicate from that book -- Mexican pottery, glassware, etc. 
We also have coffee table books of Diego Rivera's paintings.  My art
teacher once told me I should have been a muralist like him since she said my
paintings were always so outsized. 
 
In the other group I belong to there is a fellow from Jerez, (where my
father was born) whose father cooks the dishes from Jerez.  I will ask
him for his father's favorite foods and beg for the recipes.
 
Emilie Garcia
Port Orchard, WA ---

----- Original Message -----
From: Janet V. Iglesias
To: ranchos@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2006 3:53
PM
Subject: RE: [ranchos] Memories of
food


Hi Esperanza:
 
I think it was common back in the days or even in
present time to do that. I even catch myself doing it with my family. My mom
use to make us (Children) separate food from my father because he liked his
food extremely hot/Spicy! She would make herself the same thing as my father
but without all the jalapeños/serranos/chile de arbol. It eventually changed
when we got older and we were able to love the food as hot as my
dad.
 
In my house my husband and I love to put chile in
everything we eat and my kids do not like it. So, I have to prepare them
something completely different. It's sad to say but my  7yr old son has
refused to eat mexican food for a long time because he thinks it looks
disgusting . . . But I'm changing all that!!! Last week he ate a burrito de
Chorizo and loved it. I'm more than willing to share recipes with the group.
I'm married to someone from Jalisco, so I have made it my mission to learn a
lot of dishes from my target area. I also have purchased the recipe book,
Frida's Fiestas : Recipes and Reminiscences of Life with Frida
Kahlo.

 
It is an awesome book with great recipes I
recommend it. I will add some from there . . .
 
 
~Janet Iglesias
Murrieta, CA

From: ranchos@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:ranchos@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
latina1955@aol.com
Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2006 3:13
PM
To: ranchos@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [ranchos]
Memories of food

Joseph,
 
I just loved your story.  It reminded me of one I would like to
share.
 
I was raised by foster parents from Jalisco, my foster mother was from
LaBarca while my foster father was from Tepatitlan.
 
He worked for Santa Fe, the graveyard shift, she was a stay-at-home
mom.  Our eating routine usually started with "leche con pan dulce" for
breakfast.  We came home to a hot meal every day (she wasn't the best
cook, but it was always good and substantial).  When we got home from
school, we did chores, homework, etc.  Then she would serve her husband
his own meal (always different from what she served us or herself).  We
would always wonder why he got the "special" looking stuff, but dared not
ask.  Later, we would eat something light, like tostadas, and right
before bed we would have our pan dulce with our leche.
 
One night, when my foster father was working and my brothers were
out playing (I was never allowed to go out and play, as I had to be chaperoned
at all times), I saw her eating fish.  She was eating it with such
delight, and I asked to taste it.  She let me taste it, but I did not
like it.  This was one of the first times that I had ever seen
her eat or prepare fish - she said it reminded her of childhood, but did not
elaborate.
 
Now that left an impression upon me, because fish was expensive and not
necessarily readily available in Chicago (fresh) during those days, nor did we
ever get fish when we went to Jalisco visiting family.  Just recently, I
learned that her father was a fisherman - he used to fish at the Laguna de
Chapala.  It saddened me that she would prepare special meals for
her husband and separate meals for herself and us. 
 
I am wondering if anyone else had a similar ritual when they grew
up?  Can anyone tell me why pan dulce was served right before bedtime and
a light supper provided? 
 
Esperanza

JANET,    HOW DO YOU CURE MEXICAN POTTERY  FOR COOKING?  I UNDERSTAND THAT THERE ARE SEVERAL WAYS,  I JUST PURCHASED SOME OLLAS/ POTS  AND NEED SOME ASSISTANCE.  PERHAPS OTHERS IN THE GROUP HAVE AN IDEA.    I WAS TOLD THAT IN DURANGO THEY USE "CAL"  MIX IT WITH WATER UNTILL IT MAKES A PASTE AND COVER THE INSIDE OF THE POTS,  IT THEN CURES FOR ONE OR TWO DAYS AND IS WASHED THROUGHLY.    ONE MUST ALWAYS USE GLOVES TO APPLY THE LYE BECAUSE IT BURNS THE SKIN.  I JUST CAN'T QUITE BRING MYSELF TO USE THIS METHOD....WHAT DO YOU ALL THINK???? I WOULD LOVE TO COOK BEANS IN MY NEW OLLA JUST LIKE MY ABUELA AURELIA USED TOO,   BUT..... I AM LEARY!    YOLANDA MEDINA PEREZ 

janet iglesias <reynavaleria@hotmail.com>
wrote: Emilie: I'm a die hard fan of Frida Kahlo as well . . . I was 10 years old when my parents took me to Guanajuato and we were able to walk thorough one of their homes (Diego & Frida). It was beautiful and I will never forget it. Since then I have made it a mission to read about her as much as possible. I'm contemplating on buying her diary. Have you read it? I also love the movie! I cried my eyes out! About Mexican pottery . . . I have tons because I'm always going to Tijuana to visit family, it's great to live so close to the border.




Janet Iglesias From: "Emilie Garcia" <auntyemfaustus@hotmail.com>
Reply-To: ranchos@yahoogroups.com
To: <ranchos@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [ranchos] Memories of food
Date: Fri, 3 Mar 2006 16:03:01 -0800

Janet,   I have that Frida Kahlo book too.  I just love it.  I would love to have a little blue house decorated just like hers, but my husband, like his aunts in Mexico, hates anything "ethnic" in décor.  He likes only contemporary.  My sister is so lucky.  Not that she is a widow, but that she is able to decorate her house just like Frida's with Diego Rivera reproductions and some of Frida's art too. She and I are always on the lookout
for items to duplicate from that book -- Mexican pottery, glassware, etc.  We also have coffee table books of Diego Rivera's paintings.  My art teacher once told me I should have been a muralist like him since she said my paintings were always so outsized.    In the other group I belong to there is a fellow from Jerez, (where my father was born) whose father cooks the dishes from Jerez.  I will ask him for his father's favorite foods and beg for the recipes.   Emilie Garcia Port Orchard, WA --- ----- Original Message ----- From: Janet V. Iglesias To: ranchos@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, March 03, 2006 3:53 PM Subject: RE: [ranchos] Memories of food
Hi Esperanza:   I think it was common back in the days or even in present time to do that. I even catch myself doing it with my family. My mom use to make us (Children) separate food from my father because he liked his food extremely hot/Spicy! She would make herself the same thing as my father but without all the jalapeños/serranos/chile de arbol. It eventually changed when we got older
and we were able to love the food as hot as my dad.   In my house my husband and I love to put chile in everything we eat and my kids do not like it. So, I have to prepare them something completely different. It's sad to say but my  7yr old son has refused to eat mexican food for a long time because he thinks it looks disgusting . . . But I'm changing all that!!! Last week he ate a burrito de Chorizo and loved it. I'm more than willing to share recipes with the group. I'm married to someone from Jalisco, so I have made it my mission to learn a lot of dishes from my target area. I also have purchased the recipe book, Frida's Fiestas : Recipes and Reminiscences of Life with Frida Kahlo.   It is an awesome book with great recipes I recommend it. I will add some from there . . .     ~Janet Iglesias Murrieta, CA
From: ranchos@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ranchos@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
latina1955@aol.com
Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2006 3:13 PM
To: ranchos@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [ranchos] Memories of food

Joseph,   I just loved your story.  It reminded me of one I would like to share.   I was raised by foster parents from Jalisco, my foster mother was from LaBarca while my foster father was from Tepatitlan.   He worked for Santa Fe, the graveyard shift, she was a stay-at-home mom.  Our eating routine usually started with "leche con pan dulce" for breakfast.  We came home to a hot meal every day (she wasn't the best cook, but it was always good and substantial).  When we got home from school, we did chores, homework, etc.  Then she would serve her husband his own meal (always different from what she served us or herself).  We would
always wonder why he got the "special" looking stuff, but dared not ask.  Later, we would eat something light, like tostadas, and right before bed we would have our pan dulce with our leche.   One night, when my foster father was working and my brothers were out playing (I was never allowed to go out and play, as I had to be chaperoned at all times), I saw her eating fish.  She was eating it with such delight, and I asked to taste it.  She let me taste it, but I did not like it.  This was one of the first times that I had ever seen her eat or prepare fish - she said it reminded her of childhood, but did not elaborate.   Now that left an impression upon me, because fish was expensive and not necessarily readily available in Chicago (fresh) during those days, nor did we ever get fish when we went to Jalisco visiting family.  Just recently, I learned that her father was a fisherman - he
used to fish at the Laguna de Chapala.  It saddened me that she would prepare special meals for her husband and separate meals for herself and us.    I am wondering if anyone else had a similar ritual when they grew up?  Can anyone tell me why pan dulce was served right before bedtime and a light supper provided?    Esperanza

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Janet,
 
No, I didn't know Frida's diary was published.  I will order it from
Amazon.  Thanks,
 
Emilie

----- Original Message -----
From: janet iglesias
To: ranchos@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2006 4:08
PM
Subject: Re: [ranchos] Memories of
food

Emilie:


I'm a die hard fan of Frida Kahlo as well . . . I was 10 years old when my
parents took me to Guanajuato and we were able to walk thorough one of their
homes (Diego & Frida). It was beautiful and I will never forget it. Since
then I have made it a mission to read about her as much as possible. I'm
contemplating on buying her diary. Have you read it? I also love the movie! I
cried my eyes out! About Mexican pottery . . . I have tons because I'm always
going to Tijuana to visit family, it's great to live so close to the
border.





Janet Iglesias

From: "Emilie Garcia" <auntyemfaustus@hotmail.com>
Reply-To:
ranchos@yahoogroups.com
To:
<ranchos@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [ranchos] Memories
of food
Date: Fri, 3 Mar 2006 16:03:01 -0800

Janet,
 
I have that Frida Kahlo book too.  I just love it.  I would
love to have a little blue house decorated just like hers, but my husband,
like his aunts in Mexico, hates anything "ethnic" in décor.  He likes
only contemporary.  My sister is so lucky.  Not that she is a
widow, but that she is able to decorate her house just like Frida's with
Diego Rivera reproductions and some of Frida's art too. She and I are always
on the lookout for items to duplicate from that book -- Mexican pottery,
glassware, etc.  We also have coffee table books of Diego Rivera's
paintings.  My art teacher once told me I should have been a muralist
like him since she said my paintings were always so outsized. 
 
In the other group I belong to there is a fellow from Jerez, (where my
father was born) whose father cooks the dishes from Jerez.  I will
ask him for his father's favorite foods and beg for the recipes.
 
Emilie Garcia
Port Orchard, WA ---

----- Original Message -----
From: Janet V. Iglesias
To: ranchos@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2006 3:53
PM
Subject: RE: [ranchos] Memories of
food


Hi Esperanza:
 
I think it was common back in the days or even
in present time to do that. I even catch myself doing it with my family.
My mom use to make us (Children) separate food from my father because he
liked his food extremely hot/Spicy! She would make herself the same thing
as my father but without all the jalapeños/serranos/chile de arbol. It
eventually changed when we got older and we were able to love the food as
hot as my dad.
 
In my house my husband and I love to put chile
in everything we eat and my kids do not like it. So, I have to prepare
them something completely different. It's sad to say but my  7yr old
son has refused to eat mexican food for a long time because he thinks it
looks disgusting . . . But I'm changing all that!!! Last week he ate a
burrito de Chorizo and loved it. I'm more than willing to share recipes
with the group. I'm married to someone from Jalisco, so I have made it my
mission to learn a lot of dishes from my target area. I also have
purchased the recipe book, Frida's Fiestas : Recipes and
Reminiscences of Life with Frida Kahlo.

 
It is an awesome book with great recipes I
recommend it. I will add some from there . . .
 
 
~Janet Iglesias
Murrieta, CA

From: ranchos@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:ranchos@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
latina1955@aol.com
Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2006 3:13
PM
To: ranchos@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [ranchos]
Memories of food

Joseph,
 
I just loved your story.  It reminded me of one I would like to
share.
 
I was raised by foster parents from Jalisco, my foster mother was
from LaBarca while my foster father was from Tepatitlan.
 
He worked for Santa Fe, the graveyard shift, she was a stay-at-home
mom.  Our eating routine usually started with "leche con pan dulce"
for breakfast.  We came home to a hot meal every day (she wasn't the
best cook, but it was always good and substantial).  When we got home
from school, we did chores, homework, etc.  Then she would serve her
husband his own meal (always different from what she served us or
herself).  We would always wonder why he got the "special" looking
stuff, but dared not ask.  Later, we would eat something light, like
tostadas, and right before bed we would have our pan dulce with our
leche.
 
One night, when my foster father was working and my brothers
were out playing (I was never allowed to go out and play, as I had to be
chaperoned at all times), I saw her eating fish.  She was eating it
with such delight, and I asked to taste it.  She let me taste it, but
I did not like it.  This was one of the first times that I
had ever seen her eat or prepare fish - she said it reminded her of
childhood, but did not elaborate.
 
Now that left an impression upon me, because fish was expensive and
not necessarily readily available in Chicago (fresh) during those days,
nor did we ever get fish when we went to Jalisco visiting family. 
Just recently, I learned that her father was a fisherman - he used to fish
at the Laguna de Chapala.  It saddened me that she would prepare
special meals for her husband and separate meals for herself and
us. 
 
I am wondering if anyone else had a similar ritual when they grew
up?  Can anyone tell me why pan dulce was served right before bedtime
and a light supper provided? 
 
Esperanza


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LINKS

Aguascalientes

Criminal
offenses

Zacatecas

Zacatecas
mexico

Zacatecas
hotel

Fiesta
americana aguascalientes

YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

  •  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



  • Yolanda,
     
    I use the pottery strictly as a decorative item.  What I have is old
    and may be lead-based and not food safe.  I wouldn't try to cure it
    myself.  Some newer Mexican pottery is food-safe, but I would not cook in
    it, I would maybe serve food in it and then with a liner only. 
     
    Emilie Garcia
    Port Orchard, WA

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: Yolanda Bobby Perez
    To: ranchos@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Friday, March 03, 2006 6:33
    PM
    Subject: [ranchos] Re: MEXICAN
    POTTERY


    JANET,  
     HOW DO YOU CURE MEXICAN POTTERY  FOR COOKING?  I
    UNDERSTAND THAT THERE ARE SEVERAL WAYS,  I JUST PURCHASED SOME OLLAS/
    POTS  AND NEED SOME ASSISTANCE.  PERHAPS OTHERS IN THE GROUP HAVE AN
    IDEA.    I WAS TOLD THAT IN DURANGO THEY USE "CAL"  MIX IT
    WITH WATER UNTILL IT MAKES A PASTE AND COVER THE INSIDE OF THE POTS,  IT
    THEN CURES FOR ONE OR TWO DAYS AND IS WASHED
    THROUGHLY.    ONE MUST ALWAYS USE GLOVES TO APPLY THE LYE
    BECAUSE IT BURNS THE SKIN.  I JUST CAN'T QUITE BRING MYSELF TO USE THIS
    METHOD....WHAT DO YOU ALL THINK????

    I WOULD LOVE TO COOK BEANS IN MY NEW OLLA JUST LIKE MY
    ABUELA AURELIA USED TOO,   BUT..... I AM LEARY!   

    YOLANDA MEDINA PEREZ 

    janet iglesias
    <reynavaleria@hotmail.com> wrote:

    Emilie:
    I'm a die hard fan of Frida Kahlo as well . . . I was 10 years old when
    my parents took me to Guanajuato and we were able to walk thorough one of
    their homes (Diego & Frida). It was beautiful and I will never forget
    it. Since then I have made it a mission to read about her as much as
    possible. I'm contemplating on buying her diary. Have you read it? I also
    love the movie! I cried my eyes out! About Mexican pottery . . . I have tons
    because I'm always going to Tijuana to visit family, it's great to live so
    close to the border.





    Janet Iglesias

    From: "Emilie Garcia"
    <auntyemfaustus@hotmail.com>
    Reply-To:
    ranchos@yahoogroups.com
    To:
    <ranchos@yahoogroups.com>
    Subject: Re: [ranchos]
    Memories of food
    Date: Fri, 3 Mar 2006 16:03:01
    -0800

    Janet,
     
    I have that Frida Kahlo book too.  I just love it.  I would
    love to have a little blue house decorated just like hers, but my husband,
    like his aunts in Mexico, hates anything "ethnic" in décor.  He likes
    only contemporary.  My sister is so lucky.  Not that she is a
    widow, but that she is able to decorate her house just like Frida's with
    Diego Rivera reproductions and some of Frida's art too. She and I are
    always on the lookout for items to duplicate from that book -- Mexican
    pottery, glassware, etc.  We also have coffee table books of Diego
    Rivera's paintings.  My art teacher once told me I should have been a
    muralist like him since she said my paintings were always so
    outsized. 
     
    In the other group I belong to there is a fellow from Jerez, (where
    my father was born) whose father cooks the dishes from Jerez.  I
    will ask him for his father's favorite foods and beg for the recipes.

     
    Emilie Garcia
    Port Orchard, WA ---

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: Janet V. Iglesias
    To: ranchos@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Friday, March 03, 2006 3:53
    PM
    Subject: RE: [ranchos] Memories of
    food


    Hi Esperanza:
     
    I think it was common back in the days or
    even in present time to do that. I even catch myself doing it with my
    family. My mom use to make us (Children) separate food from my father
    because he liked his food extremely hot/Spicy! She would make herself
    the same thing as my father but without all the jalapeños/serranos/chile
    de arbol. It eventually changed when we got older and we were able to
    love the food as hot as my dad.
     
    In my house my husband and I love to put
    chile in everything we eat and my kids do not like it. So, I have to
    prepare them something completely different. It's sad to say but
    my  7yr old son has refused to eat mexican food for a long time
    because he thinks it looks disgusting . . . But I'm changing all that!!!
    Last week he ate a burrito de Chorizo and loved it. I'm more than
    willing to share recipes with the group. I'm married to someone from
    Jalisco, so I have made it my mission to learn a lot of dishes from my
    target area. I also have purchased the recipe book, Frida's
    Fiestas : Recipes and Reminiscences of Life with Frida
    Kahlo.

     
    It is an awesome book with great recipes I
    recommend it. I will add some from there . . .
     
     
    ~Janet Iglesias
    Murrieta, CA

    From: ranchos@yahoogroups.com
    [mailto:ranchos@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
    latina1955@aol.com
    Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2006 3:13
    PM
    To: ranchos@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: Re:
    [ranchos] Memories of food

    Joseph,
     
    I just loved your story.  It reminded me of one I would like
    to share.
     
    I was raised by foster parents from Jalisco, my foster mother was
    from LaBarca while my foster father was from Tepatitlan.
     
    He worked for Santa Fe, the graveyard shift, she was a stay-at-home
    mom.  Our eating routine usually started with "leche con pan dulce"
    for breakfast.  We came home to a hot meal every day (she wasn't
    the best cook, but it was always good and substantial).  When we
    got home from school, we did chores, homework, etc.  Then she would
    serve her husband his own meal (always different from what she served us
    or herself).  We would always wonder why he got the "special"
    looking stuff, but dared not ask.  Later, we would eat something
    light, like tostadas, and right before bed we would have our pan dulce
    with our leche.
     
    One night, when my foster father was working and my brothers
    were out playing (I was never allowed to go out and play, as I had to be
    chaperoned at all times), I saw her eating fish.  She was eating it
    with such delight, and I asked to taste it.  She let me taste it,
    but I did not like it.  This was one of the first times
    that I had ever seen her eat or prepare fish - she said it reminded her
    of childhood, but did not elaborate.
     
    Now that left an impression upon me, because fish was expensive and
    not necessarily readily available in Chicago (fresh) during those days,
    nor did we ever get fish when we went to Jalisco visiting family. 
    Just recently, I learned that her father was a fisherman - he used to
    fish at the Laguna de Chapala.  It saddened me that she would
    prepare special meals for her husband and separate meals for
    herself and us. 
     
    I am wondering if anyone else had a similar ritual when they grew
    up?  Can anyone tell me why pan dulce was served right before
    bedtime and a light supper provided? 
     
    Esperanza


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